Course Descriptions

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Course Descriptions and Symbols

Course Numbering

A four-digit number identifies each course. The following shows the meaning of each digit for the course number 1302.

  • First digit–class level
  • Second digit–number of credits

Last two digits–sequence in department offerings. Final digit may indicate the semester the course is offered. Spring semester courses end in even numbers and fall courses in odd numbers. The letters F (fall), S (spring), or SU (summer) at the end of each course description indicates the semester the course will be offered. Term suffixes, such as O or E indicate odd or even numbered years. Departments may offer courses not listed in the catalog. Such courses are labeled special topics (52 suffix), undergraduate research (88 suffix) and, in graduate studies, writings and research (99 suffix).

Lower level courses

  • 1000–freshman
  • 2000–sophomore
  • Upper level courses
  • 3000–junior
  • 4000–senior

Graduate courses

  • 5000–6000

Symbols

  • B–Course offered both fall and spring each year
  • F–Course offered each fall semester
  • S–Course offered each spring semester
  • Y–Course offered year round
  • O–Course offered every other year, odd-numbered years
  • E–Course offered every other year, even-numbered years
  • D–Course may be offered upon sufficient demand
  • CO–Corequisite
  • PRE–Prerequisite
  • (3:1) Course includes a laboratory–first number indicates the lecture hours per week and the second number indicates the laboratory hours per week.
  • PF–Course is Pass/Fail only; transcript will show P for credit, F for failure

(ACC) Accounting

2301  Principles of Financial Accounting. Measuring business transactions; financial statements, reporting, and analysis; accounting information systems, financial performance measures. F

2302  Principles of Managerial Accounting. Cost concepts and cost allocation; job order and process costing; activity-based systems; budgeting and cost behavior analysis; performance measurement and decision making. PRE: ACC 2301. S

3301  Intermediate Accounting I. Accounting environment; accounting process; financial statements; analysis of asset and liability elements. PRE: ACC 2302. F

3302  Intermediate Accounting II. Continuation of 3301. Analysis of stockholder equity elements; error and financial statement analysis. PRE: ACC 3301. S

3303  Cost Accounting. Cost concepts, behavior, and accounting techniques. Cost determination and decision making are emphasized. PRE: ACC 2302. F

3305  Special Problems in Accounting. Complex accounting applications. ACC 3302. F

4301  Consolidations. Advanced accounting course dealing with financial accounting and reporting in the area of business combinations. PRE: ACC 3301. F

4305  Income Tax I. Study of federal income tax laws as they affect individuals. Emphasis on application of income tax theory. PRE: ACC 2302. F

4306  Income Tax II. Corporations, partnerships, trusts, estates, and gifts. PRE: ACC 4305. D

4308  Auditing. Auditing concepts, standards, and objectives; auditing procedures; sampling techniques; internal control evaluation; the audit report. PRE: ACC 3301. S

4309  Estate Taxation. Federal taxation of estates, trusts, and estate planning. PRE: ACC 4305. D

4310  Accounting Systems. Theories, techniques, and procedures of accounting information systems for organizations. PRE: ACC 2302. D

4315  Financial Statement Analysis. Advanced study of financial topics specifically related to financial statements used primarily for making decisions to invent in business. Includes analysis of financial statements focusing on ratio, comparative and trend analysis, certain valuation concepts, and company comparisons. PRE: FIN 3300. D

4330  Internship. Work in an area of business utilizing skills developed in the accounting program. PRE: Minimum of 12 upper level hours in accounting and approval of the instructor. D

5301  Accounting Research. Accounting research using professional and scholarly literature of accounting.

5304  Governmental Accounting. Accounting for governmental and nonprofit entities. PRE: ACC 2302. S

(AEC) Agriculture Economics

3304  Farm and Ranch Management. Economic and business principles applied for more profitable operation. FE

3312  Natural Resources Economics. Integrated study of economic impacts of natural resources and private or political decisions that affect their uses. Focuses on local and regional case studies. Study of classical issues related to renewable and non-renewable resources as well as conservation and public policy concerns. SE

3315  Agricultural Policy. Governmental policy relative to farm programs, resource conservation, foreign trade, and rural development. FO

4314  Agriculture Finance and Credit. Principles of agricultural finance emphasizing cost and return from use of capital and credit, types and sources of credit and role of agricultural lending institutions. PRE: AEC 2303. FO

(AFA) Fine Arts

2350  Introduction to Fine Arts. Interdisciplinary course designed to introduce the student to basic elements of art, music, and theatre. Taught as a team effort by the music, theatre, and art departments. B

(AGR) Agriculture

1304  Principles of Soil Science. Study of the nature and properties of soils, including classification, physical properties, ecology of the soil, soil fertility, and soil conservation principles and practices. SE

4102  Agricultural Literature and Seminar. Reading assignments, current agricultural information, informal discussions, oral and/or written reports on pertinent agriculture topics. S

(ANS) Animal Science

1303  Principles of Animal Science. Study of the modern field of animal agriculture. Emphasis on breeding, feeding, management, and marketing. (2:3) FO

3314  Physiology of Farm Animals. Study of the physiological systems of animals including growth and development. S

3323  Physiology of Reproduction. Study of the reproductive processes in domestic animals with emphasis on male and female anatomy, endocrinology, estrous cycles, and fertilization. F

3403  Advanced Feeds and Nutrition. Chemical composition of foodstuffs; digestion, absorption, metabolism of nutrients and calculation of rations. F

4313  Concepts in Animal Health and Disease. Detailed study of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of diseases on domestic and wild animals. Major emphasis is placed on identification of risk factors, prevention, transmission, immunity and resistance, and pathogenesis of emerging and economically important animal diseases. SE

4324  Advanced Animal Nutrition. Biochemical and physiological bases for nutritional requirements of domestic animals. PRE: ANS 3403. SE

4330  Animal Science Practicum. Opportunity to visit selected livestock operations in the southwest. PRE: Junior standing and advisor approval. Travel fees.

(ART) Art

1303  Drawing I. Introductory studio course in drawing with attention to black and white media. Attention to development of self-expressive communication and composition in drawing through the use of line, texture, value, space and perspective. F

1304  Drawing II. Further development of self-expressive communication and composition through drawing with emphasis on color media. PRE: 1303 S

1305  Two-Dimensional Design. Introduction to the role of formalist design in art and visual media, with emphasis on two dimensional works. Studio activities explore elements and principles of design and composition. B

2305  Explorations in Media. Art experiences with a variety of media, including printmaking, clay, papier-mâché, etc., with application to the art classroom and current teaching practices. D

2306  Life Drawing. Studio-based introduction to drawing the human figure using a variety of black and white and color drawing media. Drawing of live models and other figurative resources. PRE: ART 1304. D

2307  Survey of Art History I. Survey of art history from prehistory to the 14th Century. Outside research required. F

2308  Survey of Art History II. Survey of Western painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts from the 15th Century to the present. Outside research required. S

3302  Painting I. Introduction to painting that emphasizes visual self-expression/communication through basic techniques. PRE: ART 1303 or 1305. SO

3304  Painting II. Studio-based continuation of methods and concepts learned in Painting I, with water-media, including acrylic and watercolor. Continued development of perceptual awareness, rendering, composition, and creative problem solving through study that may include still-life, figure, landscape, and abstract/conceptual subjects. PRE: ART 3302. D

3305  History of Modern Art. Study of Western art history and theory from the late 19th century through the early 21st century, including developments in avant-garde Modernism, and Post-Modernism. Examines critical subtexts and cultural milieu that influenced the transformation of Modern art. Outside research required. May satisfy general core fine arts history requirement. PRE: Sophomore standing. (D)

3306  Art and Children. Studies and activities to promote creative art expression for children with an emphasis on current trends in art education. B

3308  Three-Dimensional Design. Studio experiences and discussion to develop the use of elements and principles of design, composition, and visual expression through three-dimensional forms. A lab fee may be collected for materials as needed. PRE: ART 1305. SE

4306  Teaching Art to Adolescents. Course presents concepts and strategies for teaching in the secondary art classroom and addresses current art education and teaching practices for a diverse student population. D

4308  Art Theory and Criticism. Explorations in criticism and the theories that have shaped and/or responded to Modern and Post-modern art. Outside research required. D

4360  Senior Seminar. Independent or class study in selected area with departmental approval required. May be repeated for credit with different emphasis. D

(BIB) Bible

1010  Introduction to the Old Testament Supplement. Supplement to BIB 1310, for Bible majors who did not take a majors section of BIB 1310 and have received credit for BIB 1310. Includes reading and writing designed to introduce the student to a critical introduction to the Old Testament.

1020  Introduction to the New Testament Supplement. Supplement to BIB 1320, for Bible majors who did not take a majors section of BIB 1320 and have received credit for BIB 1320. Includes reading and writing designed to introduce the student to a critical introduction to the New Testament.

1310  Introduction to the Old Testament. Introduction to the Old Testament with careful attention given to God’s covenant relationship with Israel. Offered in the fall for majors only. B

1320  Introduction to the New Testament. Introduction to the New Testament with careful attention given to the life and teachings of Jesus. A section is offered in the spring for majors only. B

2302  Interpretation: Hermeneutics. Study of the art of interpretation and implementation of a proper exegesis of a specific biblical text. Introduction to tools of biblical research. Must be taken concurrently with BIB 2303. F

2303  Interpretation: Homiletics. Study of the art of preaching and its application to biblical text. Must be taken concurrently with BIB 2302. F

3300  Romans. Exegetical study of Paul’s epistle with significant attention to Paul’s theology and pastoral directives for the Roman church. A section is offered in the fall for majors only. F

3305  Christian Heritage. Introduction to the historical and theological developments of the Christian church from the earliest days as recorded in the book of Acts to the present. B

3310  Christian Life. Integrate previous biblical studies instruction under praxis, textual studies, and service components. B

3312  The Nature of Scripture. Surveys the history of interpretive methods used in the study of scripture from pre-Christian Judaism through the present and explores ministerial and personal questions of faith that arise from a study of historical-critical methods, textual criticism, and canon formation. PRE: C in BIB 2302 or permission of instructor. S

4090  Practicum. Supervised internship in student area of ministry, culminating in a final, written report. Recommended for summer completion with fall enrollment. F

4302  Preaching Biblical Genres. Application of varied preaching forms to a selected biblical book or genres. PRE: BIB 2303. S

4311  Advanced Biblical Interpretation. Advanced studies in various areas of biblical interpretation. The specific semester emphasis, such as narrative exegesis, the Bible as literature, rhetorical criticism, and post-modern interpretation, will be reflected on the transcripts. Students may take the course only once. PRE: BIB 2302 and 2303. S

4360  Bible Department Capstone. Supervised research project in student area of specialization, culminating in a final, written thesis. This course, together with the Practicum, represents the culmination of coursework. S

6300  Introduction to Graduate Studies. Introduces graduate students to the expectations of research, writing, and ministry implications associated with the rigors of a master's degree. Students who transfer at least 12 hours of graduate studies with a GPA of at least 2.75 may substitute another class for this offering.

6301  Introduction to the New Testament. Advanced introduction to the New Testament for exegetical and homiletic purposes with emphasis on the historical, literary, and theological dimensions of the text.

6302  Hermeneutics. Study of the history of the application of hermeneutics to the biblical text with an emphasis on the current questions in biblical interpretation.

6305  Studies in the New Testament Text. Critical study and analysis of a selected New Testament book or genres for exegesis. Students may take each book or genre only one time.

6306  New Testament Theology. Study of the doctrinal teachings presented in the New Testament.

6307  Preaching Biblical Genres. Application of varied preaching forms to a selected book or genres of the Bible.

6308  Studies in the Old Testament Text. Critical study and analysis of a selected Old Testament book or genre for exegesis. Students may take each book or genre one time.

6309  Social World of Christianity. Exploration into the environment in which Christianity arose and spread. The history, daily life, and institutions of the period will be examined in conjunction with relevant New Testament texts.

6310 Introduction to the Old Testament. Advanced introduction to the Old Testament designed for exegesis and preaching with an emphasis on the historical, literary, and theological dimensions of the text.

6313  Biblical Archaeology. Dynamics of the interplay of history, religion, and culture of the Near Middle East through an archaeological lens. Students encounter concepts of worldview, morality, religion, and culture.

6314  Social Perspectives of the Old Testament. Exploration into the environment in which the Old Testament texts were written. The history, daily life, and institutions of the periods will be examined in conjunction with Old Testament texts.

(BIH) Biblical History

6327  History of Christianity. Introduction to and survey of the history of Christianity, with an emphasis in the social, historical, and religious factors that influenced the formation of various groups and teachings.

6329  American Church History. Survey of American church history focusing on the Restoration Movement, with an emphasis on the key personalities, teachings, and development of this period.

(BIL) Biblical Languages

2311  Elementary Greek I. Elementary study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. F

2322  Elementary Greek II. Further elementary study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. S

3313  Elementary Hebrew I. Elementary study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Hebrew Bible. FD

3324  Elementary Hebrew II. Further elementary study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Hebrew Bible. SD

3331  Intermediate Greek I. Intermediate study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. PRE: BIL 2322. F

3342  Intermediate Greek II. Further intermediate study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. PRE: BIL 2322. S

4336  Intermediate Hebrew I. Intermediate study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Hebrew Bible. PRE: BIL 3324. FD

4345  Intermediate Hebrew II. Further intermediate study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Hebrew Bible. PRE: BIL 3324. SD

4351  Advanced Greek I. Advanced study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. D

4357  Advanced Hebrew I. Advanced study of the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of the Hebrew Bible. D

4362  Advanced Greek II. Exegesis, with attention to advanced grammar, semantics, and textual criticism. SD

4367  Advanced Hebrew II. Exegesis, with attention to advanced grammar, Hebrew poetry, and textual criticism. D

6311  Elementary Greek I. Introduction to Greek grammar and vocabulary. D

6312  Elementary Greek II. Greek grammar with an emphasis on reading in the New Testament. D

6314  Elementary Hebrew I. Introduction to Hebrew grammar and vocabulary. D

6315  Elementary Hebrew II. Hebrew grammar with an emphasis on reading in the Old Testament. D

(BIO) Biology

1300  Human Biology. Survey of human systems with an emphasis on integration of activities and heredity. Meets non laboratory requirements; not for majors in agriculture or biology. B

1303  Integrated Science I. Introduction to earth science and its relationship to the planets in the solar system, composition and atmosphere. Not for science majors. (2:3) F

1304  Integrated Science II. Study of matter and energy types and transformations. Includes a section on the relationship of plants and plant life to energy changes. Not for science majors. (2:3) S

1305  Contemporary Investigations in Biology. Contemporary issues in biology from evolution to genetics to ecology and ecosystem levels of biological organization. B

1405  Majors Biology I. Fundamentals of molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics. PRE: High school biology is  strongly recommended. (3:3) F

1406  Majors Biology II. Fundamentals of organization of both plants and animals, including biological diversity and interdependence. (3:3) S

2401  Human Anatomy and Physiology I. Structure and function of cells, tissues, and the general body plan; the integument, skeletal, and muscular systems. (3:3) F

2402  Human Anatomy and Physiology II. Continuation of BIO 2401. Structure and function of the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and nervous systems, as well as a study of fluid, electrolyte and Ph balance of the body. (3:3) S

3111  Microbiology Lab. Lab to be taken concurrently with BIO 3310. For science majors only. B

3300  Genetics. Principles of inheritance from both a classical and molecular perspective. PRE: BIO 1405. S

3301  Introductory Genetics. Overview of the principles of inheritance for nursing and non-science majors. For nursing majors only. B

3303  Cell and Molecular Biology. Structure and functions of the cell. PRE: CHE 1305 or consent of instructor. (2:3) F

3304  Advanced Botany. Survey of the plant kingdom. Classification, structure, function and development are emphasized. (2:3) F

3305  Advanced Zoology. Survey of the animal kingdom. Classification, structure, function and development are emphasized. (2:3) S

3310  General Microbiology. Characteristics of microorganisms, their culture, uses, control and immunological aspects in industrial, domestic, and medical areas. Concurrent registration in the complementary laboratory course is required. PRE: CHE 1305 or 1307 and one year of the following courses: General Biology or BIO 2401 and 2402. This would apply to anyone wanting to take this course. B

3314  Physiology of Reproduction. Study of the reproductive processes in domestic animals. Emphasis on male and female anatomy, endocrinology, spermatogenesis, fertilization, parturition, reproductive cyclicity, and reproductive behavior. F

3320  Analytical Biotechnology. Introduction to laboratory techniques and analysis used in biochemistry. Topics include gel electrophoresis, acrylamide electrophoresis, restriction enzyme digestion, transformation of cells, purification and analysis of DNA, protein purification, PCR, and bioinformatics. Laboratory exercises reinforce scientific method, lab safety, importance of laboratory notebooks, applied problem solving, and the fundamentals of instrumentation. (1:6) S

3322  Nutrition. Study of nutrients, their functions and food sources, recommended daily allowances, deficiency and toxicity symptoms, and sound principles for nutrition throughout the life cycle. B

3325  General Entomology. Introduction to entomology, including the biology and diversity of insects and an introduction to management of insect pests of man, animals and plants. (2:3) D

3406  Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. Study of vertebrate structure with emphasis on comparison of organ systems. Representative forms will be used in the laboratory. PRE: BIO 2401 and 2402 or consent of instructor. (2:3) FO

4102  Biological Literature and Seminar. Review of classical and recent biological literature with both oral and written presentations required. PRE: Senior standing and 9 advanced hours in BIO. S

4112  Animal Physiology Lab. Physiology lab to be taken concurrently with BIO 4312. S

4303  Evolution. History, evidences, and theories of the origin and development of living organisms. PRE: 6 hours of science, BIO recommended. F

4312  Animal Physiology. Functions of animal systems with emphasis on digestion, respiration, circulation and endocrinology. Concurrent registration in the complementary laboratory course is required. S

4318  Biometrics. Introduction to statistics with primary emphasis on the biological and agricultural disciplines. Foundational principles of statistical theory and application including terminology, graphing, probability distributions, correlation, regression, experimental design, and statistical inference are covered. SE

4324  Embryology. Stages in development and the control of these processes with emphasis on the vertebrates. (2:3) SO

(BNT) New Testament

3303  General Writings. Intermediate studies of Hebrews, James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, 1 John, 2 John, 3 John, Jude, and/or Revelation. Specific topics will appear on the transcript. FO

3306  Paul’s Epistles. Intermediate studies of 1 Corinthians, 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, 1 Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus, and/or Philemon. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. FE

4304  Acts. Advanced studies in the book of Acts. SE

4305  Synoptic Gospels. Advanced studies in Matthew, Mark, and/or Luke. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. SO

(BOM) Organizational Management

4304  Managerial Economics. Principles of economics used in managerial decision making related to resource allocation.

4305  Personal Values and Organizational Ethics. Corporate social responsibility, stakeholder management and ethical models applied to case studies. Students develop a personal philosophy of ethics.

4306  Managerial Accounting. Integrates external financial accounting with internal cost account environments.

4312  Managerial Finance. Corporate finance in organizational financial planning.

4324  Organization Theory. Overview of the development of modern organization theory.

4325  Leadership in Organizations. Managerial leadership in organizations.

4326  Strategic Management. Leadership roles in innovation and change management.

(BOT) Old Testament

3303  Poetry and Wisdom. Intermediate studies in Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, and/or Lamentations. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. FO

3304  Historical Books. Intermediate studies in Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 Samuel, 2 Samuel, 1 Kings, 2 Kings, 1 Chronicles, 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, and/or Esther. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. SE

3305  Minor Prophets. Intermediate studies in Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and/or Malachi. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. SO

4306  Old Testament Law. Advanced studies in Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Number, and/or Deuteronomy. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. PRE: BIB 3312 or permission of instructor. FE

4307  Major Prophets. Advanced studies in Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and/or Daniel. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. D

(BUA) Business Administration

1300  Introduction to Business. Survey of the nature of business and its relationship to society. Designed for beginning freshmen and students with no more than 6 hours of business administration courses. B

2199  Free Enterprise. Students in Free Enterprise participate in projects, attend competitions, and make presentations. F

2299  Free Enterprise. A continuation of BUA 2199. S

2310  Business Statistics. Collection, presentation, analysis, and interpretation of statistics applicable to business. PRE: MAT 1311. B

3302  Case Study Analysis. Case study approach to identifying and solving problems in organizations.

3305  Principles of Marketing. Current trends in marketing conditions, marketing agencies, factors affecting buying. F

3306  Consumer Behavior. Buying decision process and factors affecting buying behavior. Development of effective marketing strategy and tactics by understanding how and why consumers respond to marketing stimuli. PRE: BUA 3305.

3310  Money and Banking. Organization and operation of commercial banks and the money market. Examination of central banking and monetary policy. PRE: ECO 2301. B

3320  Business Ethics. Examine various theories of ethics, stressing Christian ethics in a business context. Special emphasis on current topics in business ethics. PRE: ACC 2301.

4199  Leadership in Free Enterprise. Leadership role in Enactus student organization. Identifying and initiating projects in free enterprise, recruitment of new team members, organizing team, and encouraging participation. Readings and other assignments are assigned to develop competencies in planning, leading, organizing, and controlling and their application to leadership in organizations. PRE: BUA 2299 and permission of Enactus coordinator. F

4299  Leadership in Free Enterprise. Continuation of BUA 4199. PRE: BUA 4199 and permission of Enactus coordinator. S

4300  Personal Selling and Sales Promotion. Selling and negotiating and sales promotion as related to new enterprise and ongoing firm. Promotional strategies especially for small business where uniqueness of promotional tools is more critical than in large businesses. PRE: Junior standing

4301  Business Law. Introduction to the law stressing contracts, negotiable instruments, agencies, mortgages, personal property, real property, and business organization. F

4304  Marketing Research. Research methods and techniques that aid marketing management and the application of these tools to the process of obtaining information upon which to base marketing strategy. PRE: BUA 2310 and 3305. S

4320  Leadership. Examines values-based leadership principles. Fee $100.  

4330  Internship. Work in an area of business utilizing skill developed in the Business program. PRE: Senior standing and approval of the instructor.

4380  Business Policy. Integrative course focusing on an organization’s pursuit of superior economic performance over a long term by deciding what business to be in and how to compete. This is a capstone course restricted to graduating seniors only. B

(CHE) Chemistry

1105  Inorganic Chemistry Lab. Fee $50.  B

1107  General Chemistry Lab I. Fee $50.  B

1108  General Chemistry Lab II. Fee $50.  B

1305  Inorganic Chemistry. Inorganic chemistry for majors in human sciences, pre-nursing, or non-science majors. F

1307  General Chemistry I. Introduction to chemistry for students majoring in science. Includes gas laws, bonding theory, atomic structure, solutions, acid-base and redox reactions. PRE: High school chemistry. F

1308  General Chemistry II. Continuation of CHE 1307, including basic inorganic chemistry, aqueous reactions, rates, equilibrium, nuclear and some descriptive chemistry. PRE: CHE 1307. S

2402  Integrated Organic and Biochemistry. Organic and biochemistry for agriculture, nutrition, pre-nursing and education majors. Emphasis is on nomenclature, major functional groups and reactions of organic and biochemical. Not intended for chemistry or biology majors. PRE: CHE 1305, 1105. S

3101  Organic Chemistry I Lab. Practice in basic operations and preparations of organic chemistry using micro lab ware. Fee $50.  F

3102  Organic Chemistry II Lab. Additional organic chemistry preparations, functional group reactions, and identification of unknowns using traditional means, IR, and NMR spectra. Fee $50.  S

3105  Analytical Chemistry I Lab. Practice in analytical chemistry with an emphasis on wet methods,; gravimetric, titrimetric and potentiometric analyses. FO

3181, 4182 Undergraduate Research. Research in chemistry, where students complete a minimum of 180 hours, 12 hours a week for a 15 week term, work in the Biochemistry  Research Laboratory in order to receive this credit. A paper summarizing the work, written in an appropriate journal style will be submitted by each student to the Research Supervisor/Course Instructor. May be taken up to four terms for a total of 4 credit hours of undergraduate research. PRE: Prior consent of Research Supervisor. B

3310  Laboratory Management and Demonstrations. Equips students to equip and organize a stockroom, conduct laboratory sessions with groups, and to safely and effectively use demonstrations.

3300  Introductory Biochemistry. Survey of biochemistry for students in agriculture, human sciences, dietetics, nutrition and education. Not for chemistry or biology majors. PRE: CHE 3301 or consent of instructor. S

3301  Organic Chemistry I. Hydrocarbons, stereochemistry, and organometallics. PRE: CHE 1308. F

3302  Organic Chemistry II. Continuation of 3301 with other organic series, NMR, IR. PRE: CHE 3301. S

3305  Analytical Chemistry I. Quantitative chemical analysis by gravimetric and volumetric methods. FO

3307  Advanced Instrumentation and Laboratory Methods. Study in the use of spectroscopic, spectrophotometric and chromatographic instruments in chemical analyses and the chemistry behind the instruments. S

3320  Analytical Biotechnology. Introduction to laboratory techniques and analysis used in biochemistry. Topics include gel electrophoresis, acrylamide electrophoresis, restriction enzyme digestion, transformation of cells, purification and analysis of DNA, protein purification, PCR, and bioinformatics. Laboratory exercises reinforce scientific method, lab safety, importance of laboratory notebooks, applied problem solving, and fundamentals of instrumentation. PRE: CHE 3301 or CHE 2402 (1:6) D

3406  Analytical Chemistry II. Analysis by instrumental methods: spectroscopic, electrical, and chromatographic. (2:6) SE

4102  Chemical Literature and Seminar. Emphasizes acquaintance with chemical literature and how to make a literature search. Includes research projects and a research paper. D

4111  Biochemistry Lab I. Lab experiments covering protein, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids. For students who are required or who wish to take a lab with biochemistry. D

4112  Biochemistry Lab II. Continuation of 4111. Experiments over enzymes, vitamins, drugs, and specialized topics. SD

4123  Physical Chemistry Lab I. Practice in physical chemistry where the experiments emphasize thermodynamics and kinetics. FE

4311  Biochemistry I. Structure and properties of proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids, bioenergetics, and intermediary metabolism. PRE: CHE 3301 or concurrent. F

4312  Biochemistry II. Nucleic acids, protein synthesis, nutrition, the immune system, drug metabolism, and hormones. S

4323  Physical Chemistry I. Introduction to theoretical chemistry. Gas properties, thermodynamics, equilibrium, and electrochemistry. PRE: CHE 1308 and MAT 1403 or concurrent. FE

4424  Physical Chemistry II. Quantum mechanics, kinetics, spectroscopy. (3:3) SO

(COM) Communication

1100,2100,3100,4100 Electronic Activity Lab. Involvement in various productions assisting in setup, running, and post production activities for video and audio at university games, productions, and chapel. May be repeated for credit. B

1351  Principles of Mass Media. Introduction to mass media and the major issues that influence media. The course will be predominantly a discussion of these major issues, such as freedom of the press, and how issues influence the journalist and society. F

2303  Principles of Announcing. Fundamentals of announcing theory focusing on clear diction, delivery style, and thematic elements of production. Students will produce audition tape for submission to industry. F

2311  Introduction to Public Address. Introduction to the basic theories of public speaking. An emphasis is placed on delivery skills and communication apprehension. Students learn to prepare and deliver informative and persuasive speeches in an appropriate manner. D

2312  UIL Events. Study of University Interscholastic League (UIL) speech events. Debate, oral interpretation, prose and poetry are among the events examined. Emphasis is placed on coaching and judging the events at the high school level. SE

2340  Communication for the Professional. Professional communication situations relevant to student field. B

2348  Communication Theory. Introduction to formal research methods within the field and examination of quantitative and qualitative empirical techniques. F

2351  Introduction to Public Relations. Introduction to basic principles and trends of current public relations theories and practices and the workings of mass media. F

3301  Sports Writing and Reporting. Study of traditional storytelling formats with special instruction in sports style, interviewing techniques, research strategies, sports law, sports and new media, and issues of race and gender. F

3310  Systems in Organizational Communication. Systems approach to communication principles applied to managerial situations.

3313  Interpersonal Communication. Study of the human communication process in one to one encounters. SO

3350  Worship Media Production. Examines various issues, including song presentation software, media clips, copyright law, and use of live video in worship. Particular emphasis is placed on utilizing media to enhance worship and coordinating themed services. S

3354  Advertising. Study of mass media advertising, its selection and evaluation, including discussion of advertising theory, tactics and creativity. S

3371  Group Communication. Study of group behavior, participation, structure, leadership and the importance of group discussion to our society. F

3372  Intercultural Communication. Study of communication between peoples of various cultures and the issues that enhance and impede effective cross-cultural communication. SE

3374  Nonverbal Communication. Study of the various types of nonverbal behavior, as well as an examination of nonverbal issues such as deception, compliance gaining, and communicator competence. S

4330  Communication Internship. Communication experience in local business context under the direction and supervision of management and faculty. Internship requires 90 hours of field placement. PRE: COM 4374. B

4345  Introduction to Rhetorical Analysis. Examination of the theoretical elements of rhetorical theory, including an analysis and critique of contemporary artifacts. FO

4372  Organizational Communication. Study of communication networks found in various business, industrial, educational, and social organizations. S

4374  Persuasive Communication. Study of the psychological and rhetorical principles employed in contemporary, social, political, and advertising campaigns. FE

5301  Communication in Organizations. Study of communication networks and styles operating in organizations, especially educational institutions, as well as the role of the professional educator in those structures. D

(COU) Counseling

5091, 5092, 5093  Counseling experience involving integration of didactic and clinical material in the supervised practice of individual, group, marital, and family therapy. Weekly group and individual supervision sessions are included. PRE: Approval of program director. Fee for each: $1164.

5141  Christian Worldview in Counseling. Examination of the impact of a Christian worldview on individual and family beliefs, interaction, and structure. Consideration will be given to the role of a Christian worldview in counseling.

5310  Individual and Family Lifespan Human Development. Examines the stages of individual development as they occur in the context of the family life cycle. Consideration will be given to how various tasks, transitions, and events impact individuals and families at different stages of life. Students will integrate a linear individual perspective to human development with a systemic family perspective.

5320  Research in Counseling. Survey and analysis of existing research and research methodology in counseling. A review of the literature in selected areas is required. Major research reports are evaluated for methodological strengths and weaknesses. Fee $50.

5321  Statistics. Study of statistical concepts and their application to counseling. Emphasis on estimation and inferences, and statistical methods, including simple and multiple regression, single factor and multifactor analysis of variance, multiple comparisons, goodness of fit tests, contingency tables, nonparametric procedures, and power of tests.

5340  Professional Issues, Ethics, and Law. Focuses on the development of a professional attitude and identity as a marriage and family therapist and a professional counselor. Areas of consideration will include professional socialization, the role of professional organizations, licensure and certification, legal responsibilities and liabilities of clinical practice and research, family law, confidentiality issues, codes of ethics, the role of the therapist in court proceedings, and inter professional cooperation.

5353  Psychopathology of Individuals and Families. Detailed overview of psychopathology and analysis of psychopathology in educational and counseling settings. Students will receive training in the use of the DSM-IV and its application. Diagnostic and treatment planning skills will be facilitated through the use of case studies.

5354  Assessment of Individuals and Families. Examination of the major individual, marital, and family assessment strategies and instruments. Students will receive training in the use of both testing and non-testing approaches to assessment and appraisal. Attention will be given to the relationship between assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning. Fee $100.

5360  Counseling Theory and Practice. Examination of the major theoretical orientations associated with individual approaches to psychotherapy. Consideration will be given to Adlerian, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, psychodynamic, and systemic approaches to intervention. Students will be expected to develop a coherent theoretical rationale for their therapeutic interventions.

5361  Techniques of Individual and Family Counseling. Introduction to the skills and understandings involved in developing effective helping relationships. The processes, principles, and techniques associated with group leadership and group counseling will be explored in this course. An experiential component of this course will help foster the development of basic interviewing, listening, and group leadership skills. Support group strategies and resources will be reviewed and evaluated.

5362  Career Counseling. Reviews concepts, issues, and trends in the field of career counseling and career education. It is designed to consider the role of the counselor in the career decision-making process of individuals across the lifespan. Consideration will be given to the relationships between work, career development, and family functioning.

5363  Group Psychotherapy. Overview of the principles, practices, and approaches to group counseling in school and community settings.

5364  Crisis Counseling. Study of crisis with emphasis on appropriate behaviors and responses to crisis. Applied therapeutic counseling in general and crisis intervention are presented along with strategies to alleviate crisis and deal with crisis aftermath.

5365  Advanced Counseling Techniques. Experiential emphasis on developing skills in using a variety of counseling techniques. Case conceptualization skills including diagnosing, eligibility intervention strategies, treating planning, and case monitoring are explored.

5381  Foundations of Marital and Family Therapy. Comprehensive overview of the various theories and models of marital and family therapy. Consideration will be given to the therapeutic skills and assumptions associated with the following treatment approaches: cognitive-behavioral, inter-generational, narrative, solution-focused, structural, and strategic. Students will participate in an in-depth exploration of their own families of origin.

5382  Premarital and Marital Therapy. Study of the various theories and models of mate selection, marital interaction, and marital intervention. Students will receive training in diagnosing and intervening in dysfunctional relationship patterns. Strategies associated with premarital counseling and divorce adjustment counseling will also be explored.

5383  Counseling Children, Adolescents, and Their Families. Intensive overview of therapeutic strategies for working with children, adolescents and their families. Consideration will be given to developmental psychopathology. Techniques and strategies from Adlerian, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, psychodynamic, and systemic approaches will be presented.

5384  Addictions. Study of definitions of addiction, substance abuse and dependence, and counseling persons with substance abuse disorders and process disorders. Holistic approach to treatment and recovery is emphasized. Assessment, initial treatment, and intervention techniques are explored for rehabilitation of substance use disorders.

5385  Multicultural Counseling. Review of multicultural counseling literature. Focus on promotion of self-awareness and self-knowledge, facilitation of the construction of cultural knowledge to increase awareness and sensitivity to issues affecting multicultural populations, identification of intervention strategies applicable to multicultural clients, and promotion of development of a personal philosophy of substance abuse disorders.

5391  Counseling Practicum. Integration of didactic and clinical material in the supervised practice of individual, group, marital, and family therapy. Weekly group and/or individual supervision sessions are included. PRE: Approval of program director.

5392  Counseling Internship I. Integration of didactic and clinical material in the supervised practice of individual, group, marital, and family therapy. Weekly group and/or individual supervision sessions are included. PRE: Approval of program director.

5393  Counseling Internship II. Integration of didactic and clinical material in the supervised practice of individual, group, marital, and family therapy. Weekly group and/or individual supervision sessions are included. PRE: COU 5392 and approval of program director.

(CRJ) Criminal Justice

2301  Introduction to Criminal Justice. Introductory course designed to familiarize students with the facets of the criminal justice system, the sub-systems and how they interrelate, processing of offenders, punishment and its alternatives, and the future of the criminal justice system. F

2302  Fundamentals of Texas Criminal Law. Study of Texas substantive procedural and evidentiary law with emphasis on the legal elements of the most commonly committed crimes as defined by the Texas Penal Code; warrants of arrest and search and seizure, including how to prepare affidavits in support of those warrants, for judicial approval and authorization based on the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure; the law of confessions and interrogations under Texas decisional law, and how to make lawful traffic stops under Texas criminal law. S

2303  Criminal Investigation. Overview of scientific crime detection and more detailed discussion of techniques for case management and documentation, the concept of proof, the impact of emergent technology on the investigative process, interacting with victims and witnesses, and interviewing suspects. Particular emphasis may be placed on the investigation of particular types of crimes, for example, homicides, sex offenses, child abuse, and hate crimes. F

2304  Legal Aspects of Law Enforcement. Investigation, arrest, search and seizure;  constitutional and statutory law and the decisions of the United States Supreme Court and the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals. S

2305  Courts and Criminal Procedure. Examines procedural requirements for judicial processing of criminal offenders. Examines concepts of evidence sufficiency, standards of proof, due process, and constitutional safeguards. F

3301  Criminology. Overview of the major criminological perspectives and an examination of the social, political, and intellectual milieu within which each developed. The course focuses on the multi-disciplinary nature of criminological thought. F

3302  Juvenile Delinquency. Adjustment of youths as they take on the roles and statuses culturally defined for their age group; emphasis on causation, treatment, and prevention of juvenile delinquency; sociological principles for working with youth. Delinquency is reviewed as a form of deviant behavior. S

3311  White Collar Crime. Study of the ideas and perspectives that are dominant in the field of white collar crime. Topics such as organizational crime, occupational crime, legislation aimed at white collar crime, law enforcement, causes of white collar crime, and possible forms of intervention will be discussed. F

3312  Violent Offenders. Introduction to psychological issues relating to understanding, assessing, managing criminal and other abnormal behavior. An overview of mental disorders and their relationship to criminality and violence is provided. Topics include sanity, psychopathy, criminal profiling, serial killers, stalking, women who kill, and threat assessment. S

3321  Understanding Sexual Offending. Overview of the sexual offender. The origins and various motivations that lie behind sex crimes are explored as are treatment strategies and their relative effectiveness with different offender groups. Various approaches to community supervision are examined as are controversial issues such as castration of sex offenders. F

3322  Social Deviance. Psychological and sociological aspects of socially deviant behavior; theoretical overviews and implications for social control and social policy. S

3323  Family Violence. Theoretical issues, both past and present, regarding family violence in order to provide the student with an understanding of the salient issues. In addition, attention will be given to the impact family violence has on the victim and society, legal aspects of family violence, key factors associated with recognition of family violence, and pertinent research focusing on the subject. F

3324  Corrections, Probation, and Parole. Overview of the corrections system in the United States, including the legal and practical aspects of probation, parole, and incarceration systems; the court process; alternatives to imprisonment; corrections systems and functions; studies of those institutionalized in corrections facilities, including male, females, juvenile, and other special offenders; legal rights of those in corrections systems; and systems to reintegrate offenders from corrections facilities back into the community and society.

3325  Supervising Police Personnel. Introduction to supervising police personnel from the leadership perspective, including police team fundamentals of values, ethics, vision, communications, and time management; police team building, including team leadership, motivation, empowerment, team training, and vitality; and police teamwork, including organizing, performance, conflict resolution, community-oriented and problem-oriented policing, and anticipation of future issues in supervising police personnel.

3326  Crisis Intervention. Study of crisis situations in multiple settings with emphasis on appropriate behaviors and responses to crisis. Applied therapeutic counseling in general and crisis intervention are presented along with strategies to alleviate crisis and deal with crisis aftermath. S

4321  Forensic Psychology. Study of the intersection of crime, law, and psychology. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how abnormal behavior is treated in the judicial system, as well as civil commitment and criminal competencies. F 

4322  Drugs, Alcohol, and Behavior. Survey of psychological factors involved in drug use and an introduction to chemotherapy used in treatment of mental illness. S

4324  Crime Analysis and Crime Mapping. Overview of the field of crime analysis and crime mapping, including key concepts, definitions, and relevant criminological theory as well as methods and techniques of tactical, strategic, and administrative crime analysis and useful information about Internet sites that complement the topics discussed in class.

4325  Forensic Computer Examination. Overview of high-technology crime;  identity theft and other thefts on the information superhighway; digital child pornography and other abuses of children in cyberspace; financial fraud and con artistry on the Internet; investigating the Internet, including examination of online investigations and sting operations; seizure of digital evidence; obtaining and executing search warrants for digital evidence; law enforcement computer programs which aid in searching computer hard drives and computer media; legal issues pertaining to digital evidence; and the future of high-technology crimes.

4326  Terrorism and Homeland Security. Focuses on criminology and controversy of terrorism and issues of homeland security, surrounding the post 9/11 era in which we live. The course will investigate known terrorist groups and their operations around the world, as well as the U.S. position on terrorism and the War on Terror.

4327  Cyber Crimes. Examines the legal and practical issues surrounding technology-assisted crimes that generally use the internet directly to commit the crimes, including fraud, stalking, theft, drug trafficking, domestic and international terrorism. Explores how computers and media are used to store evidence of crimes.

4328  Death Penalty. Examines legal issues surrounding the death penalty, including a historical review of the death penalty from colonial times to the present; analysis of the foundational cases of Furman v. Georgia and Gregg v. Georgia; a study of the issue of racial discrimination in imposing the death penalty; the legalities of imposing the death penalty on the mentally impaired and juveniles; due process issues and the death penalty, including selection of jurors and mitigating factors in capital cases; issues surrounding appeals and Habeas Corpus in death penalty cases; the evolving standards of decency and the 8th amendment ban on cruel and unusual punishment; and a study of the trends in and the future of the death penalty.

4329  Gangs. Overview of gangs in our society and the challenges they pose for the criminal justice system. Studies critical components of dealing with gangs directly and indirectly, including juvenile delinquency, criminology, and sociology. Emphasizes distinction between gangs and gang members and the differences between the individual and group perspectives.

4333  Professionalism and Ethics in Criminal Justice. Study of theories and practices in areas of legality, morality, values, and ethics as they pertain to criminal justice. Included will be such topics as police corruption, brutality, and methods of dealing with such practices, as well as the concept of profession and professional conduct. F

(DMA) Digital Media Arts and Applications

2343  Motion Graphics. Beginning course in manipulating images in sequence with motion for web designers, graphic artists, etc. It utilizes graphics arts for expression and/or effective communication through motion for cartooning and interactive web design in a Mac environment. Lecture, demonstration, and hands on experience. Each student gains a working knowledge of Flash. Research project required. Fee $50. F

2344  Multimedia Design. Animation techniques, photo manipulation, page layout, and video for use in multimedia and web design projects. Utilizes current Adobe software: InDesign, Illustrator, Premier, Flash, and Photoshop in a Mac environment. Requires an experiential knowledge of computer graphics, color, and design techniques. Project required. Fee $50. S

3310  Digital Video I. Basic techniques for editing and manipulating digital media, such as video, sound, animation, and lighting. Introduction to filmmaking, story boarding, shooting, editing, and production. Utilizes current software to manipulate and control image output. Combines dissimilar elements to form powerful imagery in a Mac environment. Course includes use of digital video camera, scanner, and Adobe software in a Mac environment. Research project required. PRE: DMA 2344. Fee $50. F

3331  Game Design. Introduction of game design with Unity 3D game engine including storytelling, game genre, theme, audience, production, player considerations, scripts, sequences, testing, and debugging. Research project required. Instructor permission required. Fee $50.

3332  Digital Fundamentals and Imaging. Beginning course in digital photography,  image manipulation, basic art elements, design principles, color theory, and composition. Utilizes Adobe Photoshop, a current image manipulation software along with beginning digital camera techniques, bringing dissimilar elements together in order to form powerful imagery. Course emphasis is on composition and development of self-expression. Access to a digital camera required. Research project required. PRE: Junior status. Fee $50. B

3341  Advertising Design. Beginning course for visual communicators, such as artists, graphic designers, marketing advertising, and image consultants, interested in graphic arts for expression and more effective communication. Includes advertising campaigns, editorial illustrations, oral presentations, retail packaging designs, and displays. Lecture, demonstration, and hands on experience. Students gain a working knowledge of Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop in a Mac environment. Research project required. PRE: ART 1305 or DMA 3322 and junior status or departmental permission required. Fee $50. F

3342  Document Design. Contemporary design, graphics and production of mass media publications, including brochures, newsletters, annual reports, magazines, newspapers, and web content with emphasis on desktop publishing technologies. Additional emphasis on typography, papers, inks, color, production and layout. Utilizes Adobe software InDesign and Photoshop. Research project required PRE: DMA 2344 or ENG 3318 or ECA 1300 and junior status or departmental permission. Fee $50. S

4310  Digital Video II. Continuation of DMA 3310. PRE: DMA 3310. Fee $50. S

4324  Three-Dimensional Modeling. Introduces the principles and processes of 3-D modeling and animation. Areas covered include 3-D space navigation, modeling tools, rendering methods, animation concepts, material properties and creation of textures. A large range of tools and industry techniques will be covered. The creation of complex mechanical and organic 3-D objects. Software: Maya and Adobe Photoshop in a Mac environment. PRE: DMA 2344 or permission of instructor. Fee $50. S

4330  Digital Media Internship/Portfolio. Visual communication experience in a local business context under the direction and supervision of management and faculty. Internship requires 90 hours of field placement and portfolio development. B

(ECA) Extra-Curricular Activities

1111, 1112, 1113, 1114 Best Friends.

1150, 1151, 2150, 2151 Online Campus News Staff.

1161, 1162, 2161, 2162, 3161, 3162, 4161, 4162 Cheerleading.

1163, 1164, 2163, 2164, 3163, 3164, 4163, 4164 Men’s Soccer.

1165, 1166, 2165, 2166, 3165, 3166, 4165, 4166 Women’s Soccer.

1171, 1172, 2171, 2172, 3171, 3172, 4171, 4172 Baseball.

1173, 1174, 2173, 2174, 3173, 3174, 4173, 4174 Men’s Basketball.

1181, 1182, 2181, 2182, 3181, 3182, 4181, 4182 Women’s Basketball.

1183, 1184, 2183, 2184, 3183, 3184, 4183, 4184 Volleyball.

1185, 1186, 2185, 2186, 3185, 3186, 4185, 4186 Softball.

1191, 1192, 2191, 2192, 3191, 3193, 4191, 4192 Cross Country/Track.

1193, 1194, 2193, 2194, 3193, 3194, 4193, 4194 Men’s Golf.

1195, 1196, 2195, 2196, 3195, 3196, 4195, 4196 Women’s Golf.

1300 Yearbook Staff.

(ECO) Economics

2301  Macroeconomics. Introduction to macroeconomics. Emphasis on national accounts, monetary policy, fiscal policy. F

2302  Microeconomics. Introduction to microeconomics. Emphasis on theories of individual firms and market structures. PRE: ECO 2301. S

3301  Intermediate Macroeconomics. Determinants of long term economic growth, short term fluctuations in output and prices, and prominent schools of thought in macroeconomics; debates concerning the macroeconomic effects of fiscal and monetary policies. PRE: ECO 2302 F

3302  Intermediate Microeconomics. Extensions and applications of microeconomic theory. Theory of the consumer; costs of production and theory of the firm; firm behavior and market structure; markets for factors of production; markets and economic welfare. PRE: ECO 2302 S

4360  Seminar in Economics. Capstone course for economics majors. PRE: Senior standing

(EDS) Secondary Education

2310  Foundations of Education. Survey of major concepts related to the teaching profession with emphasis on educational history/philosophy, teaching as a mission, professional ethics, legal issues and culture of the school. 30 hours of field experience are required in the course. B

2320  Instructional Technology. Investigation of concepts and methods of using technology to enhance instruction, design curricula, and assess student achievement. B

3340  Middle School Education. Addresses the strikingly unique characteristics of young adolescents, age 10-14, along with strategies to meet their physical, intellectual, and social/emotional development and analyzes the functions of Middle School classrooms. S

4310  Assessment and Evaluation. Address multiple aspects of the evaluation process at the secondary level. Topics include assessment theory, sound assessment practices, standardized exam data disaggregation (TExES, TAKS), and the Professional Development Appraisal System. PRE: Concurrent enrollment in EDS 4360 and 4660. F/S.

4330  Managing Diverse Classrooms. Study and practice of the concepts and methods used to successfully manage classrooms and student behavior respective of the diversity of content, culture, ethnicity and learning abilities present in today’s schools. The presentation of multiple units of instruction is a major component of the course. Pre: Unconditional admission to Teacher Education Program and concurrent enrollment in EDS 4350. Fee $120.  B

4340  Reading, Writing and Thinking in Secondary and Middle Schools. Investigation of the concepts and methods used to successfully teach the important skills of reading, writing, and thinking in all secondary and middle school content areas. Pre: Unconditional admission to Teacher Education Program and enrollment in last semester before student teaching. B

4350  Design and Delivery. Study and practice of the interrelated processes of designing, delivering and assessing an instructional unit with emphasis on documentation of state and local curricular expectations. The presentation of multiple units of instruction is a major component of the course. PRE: Unconditional admission to Teacher Education Program and concurrent enrollment in EDS 4330. B

4360  Senior Seminar. Capstone seminar of topics related to the expectations for a beginning middle school, secondary, and all-level educators. Key topics include: Pedagogy and Professional Responsibility TExES preparation, the interviewing process, and professional, ethical, legal responsibilities. Pre: Concurrent enrollment in EDS 4360 and 4310. B

4660  Student Teaching. Culminating experience of the pre-professional teacher. This course is an all-day 15-week field experience under the supervision of university and secondary professional educators. PRE: Concurrent enrollment in EDS 4360 and 4310. Fee $240.  B

(EDU) Education

3350  Educational Psychology. Examination of physical, intellectual, social, and psychological growth and learning during childhood and adolescence. It includes the study of major theories of child and adolescent development, motivation, and measurement and assessment. Pre-service teachers will interact with experienced, practicing professionals as they observe, analyze, and apply developmental theories to learning. Fifteen hours of field experience are required. B

5301  Research for School Improvement. Introduction to basic elements of classroom action research, including developing research problems, collecting, organizing, analyzing and interpreting data, and problem solving.

5302  Advanced Learning Theory and Human Development. Advanced study of learning theory, information processing, complex cognitive processes, motivation, and learner characteristics.

5303  Integrating Educational Technology. Study of both theoretical and practical characteristics of technology integration strategies, including using instructional software, using technology media, and integrating technology into the curriculum.

5304  Curriculum and Instructional Design. Study of the major phases of the instructional process, the major theory basis associated with curriculum and instructional design, the educational advantages of using instructional design, and the principles of assessment as they are applied to educator decision making.

5305  Methods of Reading Instruction. Presents current research based instructional methods and the reading theories that support these methods going beyond the basics of basal and whole language-based programs to examine the underlying processes readers use throughout the progression of reading development.

5306  Working with the Gifted/Talented. Deals with the nature of giftedness as well as the curriculum and instruction in the variety of programs offered by school districts from heterogeneous classrooms to pull-out programs.

5307  Content Area: Writing Assessment and Instruction. Focuses on various formal and informal methods of assessing writing along with all the content areas and will identify research based instructional strategies necessary to improve student learning based on the assessment information in the content areas.

5308  Assessment and Identification of Reading Challenges. Concentrates on various formal and informal methods of assessing all skills associated specifically with reading and will discuss how assessment information is directly connected with both the identification of reading challenges and the instructional planning necessary to address those challenges.

5309  Differentiated Curriculum. Concentrates on the strategies employed to reach the needs of students in the various disciplines.

5310  Elementary School Science and Math. Study of the science and math curriculum in the elementary school, including instructional practices, methodology and assessment, content integration, reflective analysis, and related innovations.

5311  Elementary School Language Arts and Social Studies. Study of the language arts and social studies curriculum in the elementary school, including instructional practices, methodology and assessment, content integration, reflective analysis, and related innovations.

5312  Exceptionality. Study of how exceptional children are classified, the organization of educational services and related services for exceptional children, the legal requirements associated with special education programs, and instructional strategies used with exceptional students.

5313  Classroom Management. Study of classroom management principles designed to assist educators to effectively manage the behavior problems that today’s students bring to school. The primary purpose of this course is to prepare teachers to be effective managers of their classrooms so that student learning is maximized.

5314  Seminar in Reading. Study of reading as both a process and a product, including a study of emergent literacy, reading in the content areas, comprehension, and various major approaches to reading instruction, including those that deal with readers having special needs.

5315  Curriculum and Instructional Leadership. Study of educational leadership in our changing world, including a review of the qualities and ethical dimensions of effective leadership, systematically integrating curriculum and instruction, working with students, faculty, staff, and community, in collaboration, leading the instructional program, and understanding and responding to change.

5316  Ethics for the Leader. Study of the principles and theories of ethics, including philosophy and the Texas Educator Code of Ethics, with a focus on the multiple perspectives inherent to decision making in educational leadership.

5317  Assessment and Evaluation. Study of both formal and informal methods of evaluating and assessing student programs.

5320  Educational Law. Study of the legal bases of education at the national and state levels, including landmark court cases which have affected the organization and administration of schooling and the legal rights and responsibilities of educators and students.

5321  Principles of Supervision. Study of the principles of instructional and clinical supervision and leadership, including staff evaluation and development. Fee $200.

5322  Educational Business Management and Finance. Study of school business management, including accounting, budgeting processes, purchasing, data processing, personnel management, and facilities management.

5323  Administrative/Leadership Theory. Study of the principles and theories of organizational behavior, school administration, educational management and leadership, and the application of administrative concepts to problem solving in an educational setting.

5324  Administration of Special Programs. Study of the administration of special programs in schools, including the legal and academic processes involved in vocational-technical, career, compensatory, reading, and guidance programs.

5325  Advanced Curriculum Design and Development. Study of the principles of curriculum design, development, implementation, and evaluation as it relates to the public schools.

5326  The Principalship. Study of the roles of the school principal in campus-level administration. Emphasis will be placed on human relations skills, instructional leadership, curriculum development, professional relationships, personnel supervision, staff development, and the management of student discipline.

5327  Administrative Practicum. Field-based practicum designed as a capstone experience in the various areas of the principalship, such as curriculum development, instructional leadership, supervision, campus-based discipline, and/or school-based management.

5328  Integrating for Enrichment. Study of the theory, methods, and techniques of developmentally integrating special subjects, such as art, music, exercise, and sports, into the elementary curriculum.

5329  Content Area Literacy. Study of content area reading, writing, and thinking as strategic interventions in the secondary school.

5330  Issues in Education. Study of specific problems facing the secondary schools today. Emphasis will be placed upon identifying those problems and developing specific approaches to solving them. Case analysis will be the primary focus.

5331  Business and Personnel Management. Study of the primary business and personnel management functions found in K-12 schools.

5332  Teaching with Merging Technologies. Study of and practical application of design and delivery of technology-related instructional tools, including Web 2.0, interactive television, the Internet, and other telecommunication technologies.

5333  School and Community Leadership. Study of the collaborative relationships between the school and its communities, including communication patterns, diversity issues, and resource mobilization initiatives.

5334  Internet Curriculum Integration. Study and practical application of various Internet related tools in both synchronous and asynchronous environments, such as discussion groups, newsgroups, virtual chats, world-wide-web and assorted search engines, and an examination of practical and policy issues related to the information explosion and the proper use of electronic network resources across educational disciplines.

5335  Educational Technology Resource Management. Study about and development of strategies and resources in a systematic model toward managing technology resources including computers, data and video networking, satellite programs, hand-held computers, etc.

5336  Technology Tools for Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. A study, development, and delivery of a comprehensive course project that focuses on student learning outcomes related to the TEKS, AECT and ISTE standards, and critical thinking within the K-12 environment to a conference or regional district peer audience.

5337  Leadership in the Technology Program. Study of the significant issues in the field of instructional technology, including critical issues, emerging technologies, instructional development, state of the art applications, future prospects, research and evaluation, and professional development.

5340  Achievement Testing/Authentic Assessment. Provides students with knowledge, skills, and experience in choosing, administering, scoring, and interpreting appropriate formal and informal achievement assessment instruments for a variety of children with possible special education needs. Report writing using the information gained from assessment instruments will also be covered.

5342  Intelligence Testing/Authentic Assessment. Provides students with knowledge, skills, and experience in choosing, administering, scoring, and interpreting appropriate formal and informal intelligence tests and informal assessment instruments for a variety of children with possible special education needs. Report writing using the information gained from assessment instruments will also be covered.

5343  Cross Battery Learning Disability Assessment. Provides students with knowledge, skills, and experience in choosing, administering, scoring, and interpreting appropriate formal and informal assessment instruments specific for determining the presence of a learning disability based on federal guidelines for diagnosis. Report writing using the information gained from assessment instruments will also be covered.

5344  Working with Parents and Families of Children with Special Needs. Study of counseling, educational, and interview procedures to allow the special education teacher to effectively communicate and work effectively with parents and families of disabled students.

5345  Language Development in Children. Review of the development of oral language and the problems of disabled children in this area that affect learning and socialization. A review of intervention programs, techniques, and methods for use in the classroom.

5346  Behavior Management of Children with Special Needs. Review of behavior management techniques used with students in educational settings, with specific emphasis upon their application to the problems posed by disabled students.

5347  Assessing Children with Special Needs. Addresses the teachers’ involvement with the assessment of special education students to include, (1) identification of special education students and the role that special education teachers play the use of individualized standard tests; (2) diagnosis of specific curriculum-based learning, with an emphasis on curriculum-based assessment; and (3) remediation of the learning problems with particular emphasis on developing appropriate goals and objectives for the IEP.

5348  Adapting the Curriculum for Children with Special Needs. Focus on adapting the instruction and environment to meet the needs of special education students, with the primary focus how to provide the services and resources necessary for content mastery. The course will also address the different levels of the least restrictive environment.

5349  Advanced Practicum in Special Education. Practicum in special education.

5360  Seminar/Practicum for Educational Diagnosticians. Provides students with knowledge, skills, and experience for completing required paperwork, testing, and legal obligations required of educational diagnosticians. Students will also learn strategies for talking to parents and educational personnel regarding student assessments and educational plans, including participation for ARD meetings.

6101  Superintendency Practicum I. Guided experiences in central office administration under the supervision and direction of a central office administrator and a university professor.

6102  Superintendency Practicum II. Guided experiences in central office administration under the supervision and direction of a central office administrator and a university professor.

6103  Superintendency Practicum III. Guided experiences in central office administration under the supervision and direction of a central office administrator and a university professor.

6301  School Finance. Critical analysis of public school finance, emphasizing planning, budgeting, resource management, fiscal operations, and accountability with a special focus on financing Texas public school districts.

6302  School District Policy and Politics. Emphasis on policy and governance issues, including superintendent and board relationships, conflict resolution, communication, community relations, school law issues, communications, and ethics.

6303  School District Evaluation. Evaluation of the overall effectiveness of a district in areas including, but not limited to academic effectiveness, school district climate, site-based decision making processes, financial stability and integrity, and physical plant efficiency using multiple assessment techniques that are based on state and national criteria and/or grounded in empirical research.

6304  The Superintendency. Course examines the role and relationships of the superintendent of the local school district in a climate of restructuring and change for quality education. The major emphasis will be on the attainment of the TExES domains and competencies for Texas superintendent certification.

(EEL) Elementary Education

2307  Conceptual Development of Math for Elementary Teachers. Designed to develop a connection between the conceptual understanding of mathematical concepts and abstract thinking in the areas of number sense, patterns, operations, and pre-algebra for young children. F

2308  Conceptual Development of Math for Elementary Teachers II. Designed to develop a connection between the conceptual understanding of mathematical concepts and abstract thinking in the areas of number sense, patterns, operations, plane geometry, probability, measurement, interpretation of data, problem solving, and student assessment for the middle school child. S

2310  Teachers, Schools, and Society/Tutoring. Introduction to reality of the teaching profession in a diverse society. Includes minimum of 24 clock-hours tutoring students in classroom setting. B

2320  Instructional Technology. Study of the principles of instructional technology and the use of multi-sensory aids to facilitate learning. B

3306  Integrated Social Studies. Overview of the social sciences as related to elementary school curriculum. Content includes economics, geography, history, and political science. FS

3320  Early Childhood Education. Introduction, overview, and analysis of basic principles, development, and types of programs designed to enhance the cognitive, physical, and social/emotional development of young children. Includes a minimum of twelve clock-hours in an early childhood classroom. B

4160  Teaching Certification I. Study of the Texas certification framework and teacher appraisal system with special emphasis on the Early Childhood and Middle School Generalist TExES. B

4170  Teacher Certification II. Study of the Texas Certification framework and teacher appraisal system with special emphasis on professionalism and the Pedagogy and Professional Responsibility TExES. B

4210  Classroom Management and Organization. Study of various techniques and theories in organizing and managing elementary classrooms and student behavior. B

4301  Social Studies Methods/Practicum. Developmentally appropriate strategies and techniques for introducing social studies content to elementary and middle school students. Emphasis will be given to the development of integrated thematic curriculum guides and delivery of teaching units. Includes a two-week practicum. Fee $50 B

4302  Mathematics/Science Methods. Developmentally appropriate strategies and techniques for introducing mathematics and science content to elementary and middle school students. Emphasis on the development of integrated thematic curriculum guides and delivery of teaching units. B

4320  Assessment and Evaluation in the Elementary School. Study of assessment and evaluation as applied to the elementary school. Fee $120.  B

4340  The Elementary School. Organization of elementary school functions with attention to theories, programs, and special needs. Includes observation and evaluation of classroom teaching. B

4650  Teacher Aide Practicum. Required of public school teacher aides to complete requirements for certification in EC-4. Requires current employment in the certification area, having completed a minimum of 1½ years in that position. The practicum will be no less than one semester. D

4660  Student Teaching in the Elementary/Middle School. Teaching under supervision in the elementary school for twelve weeks in an all-day assignment. Includes weekly seminar to address special topics. PRE: Admission to Educator Certification. Fee $240.  B

(ENG) English

1301  Composition Studies. Study of the writing process that requires students to write extensively in a variety of modes and styles, including personal, academic, and research essays. Includes an application of research techniques and critical thinking. B

1302  Composition and Literature. Critical examination of a variety of literary forms and a careful examination of the writing process, culminating in a research paper. PRE: ENG 1301. B

2301  Masterpieces of Literature. Critical study of selected works from the classical period through the Renaissance, including a study of classics in the non-Western tradition. PRE: ENG 1302. B

3300  Literature for Children and Young Adults. Survey of available literature, including selection and evaluation standards and techniques for evoking a love of reading and responses to books. PRE: ENG 1302.

3302  Introduction to English Studies. Examination of the methods and materials appropriate for teaching language, literature, and composition at the secondary level. PRE: ENG 1302.

3304  Advanced Composition. Workshop approach to the theory and practice of writing creative non-fiction. PRE: ENG 1302.

3305  Introduction to Creative Writing. Workshop approach to the craft of writing fiction, poetry, and drama. PRE: ENG 1302.

3307  Classical and Contemporary Rhetoric. From the ancient world to the worldwide web–a study of influential texts in the development of rhetorical theory, with an emphasis on the art of written discourse. PRE: ENG 1302.

3308  Technical Writing. Design and preparation in a networked computer environment of special writing projects appropriate to the world of work, including resumes, letters, proposals, reports, instructions, and oral presentations. PRE: ENG 1302.

3310  Writing Grant Proposals. Introduction to writing professional grants and proposals through the application of rhetorical principles. Practice in applying rhetorical principles to documents that manage change. PRE: ENG 1302, recommend ENG 3008.

3311  American Novel. Study of the American novel with emphasis on trends in the twentieth century. PRE: ENG 1302.

3313  American Literature to 1890. American literature from its beginnings to the rise of Realism. PRE: ENG 1302.

3317  Approaches to Advanced Grammar. Study of the history of the English language and survey of traditional and modern grammars. PRE: ENG 1302.

3318  Rhetoric of Design. Introduction to critical analysis of discursive and non-discursive artifacts, with focus on the rhetorical implications of design. PRE: ENG 1302, recommend ENG 3307.

3321  African-American Literature. Study of developing themes in African-American literature from the slave narrative to contemporary texts, including non-fiction, poetry, and fiction. PRE: ENG 1302.

3322  American Literature since 1890. American literature covering the periods of Realism, Modernism, and Post-modernism. PRE: ENG 1302.

4301  Multicultural Literature. Study of literature by authors from a variety of geographical and cultural backgrounds. PRE: ENG 1302.

4304  Fiction Writing Workshop. Round-table workshop requiring the production and presentation of short fiction and chapters from novels, culminating in a portfolio. PRE: ENG 1302, ENG 3305 or permission of instructor.

4306  Christianity and Literature. Study of how Christianity has shaped Western literature and aesthetics from Augustine forward, with emphasis on overtly Christian masterpieces. PRE: ENG 1302.

4308  Poetry Writing Workshop. A round-table workshop requiring the production and presentation of poems in various genres, culminating in a portfolio. PRE: ENG 1302, ENG 3305 or permission of instructor.

4313  Studies in Drama. Study of selected works of Third World, European, British, and American drama. PRE: ENG 1302.

4314  Comparative Literature. Study of themes, such as love, justice, war, the quest, politics, and genres such as novel, epic, short story, drama, poetry, Bildungsroman, in world literatures in translation. PRE: ENG 1302.

4315  Major British Writers to 1800. A representative selection of the most significant British literature from Beowulf to Burns. PRE: ENG 1302.

4316  English Novel. Study of the development of the English novel from its antecedents to the present with emphasis on trends in the twentieth century. PRE: ENG 1302.

4323  Major British Writers since 1800. Significant British literature from Blake to Philip Larkin. PRE: ENG 1302.

4324  Studies in Shakespeare. Analysis of the development of Shakespeare’s art and thought as viewed through his better known plays. PRE: ENG 1302.

4326  Literature and the Film. Review of film theory and a study of the written and filmed versions of significant works of literature. PRE: ENG 1302.

4360  Senior Seminar. Examines and verifies the research and writing skills of seniors specializing in English.

5301  Advanced Seminar in Writing. Study of the writing skills typically encountered by educators in student centered schools. Included is a study of writing across the curriculum and writing as it relates to content areas.

(ESL) English as a Second Language

3372  Teaching the Multicultural/Multilingual Student. Strategies and techniques for teaching and working with the multicultural/multilingual student. Introduces the principles of multicultural and bilingual education examines ways to adapt instruction and classroom context to address the needs of culturally, linguistically, and ethnically diverse students.

3382  First and Second Language Acquisition. Focuses on the foundations of language teaching. Topics include English Language Learner (ELL) characteristics, First (L1) and Second Language (L2) acquisition theories, and applying major language teaching methodologies in the classroom. Development of language as related to bilingual education and the teaching of English as a second language

3392  English as a Second Language Methodology for Pre-K-12 Grade. Allows students to explore and reflect on the foundational knowledge for second language literacy by examining its philosophy, theory and examples of success in classroom practices. Topics include English Language Learner (ELL) characteristics, First (L1) and Second Language (L2) acquisition theories. Explore the application of major language teaching methodologies in Pre-K-12 grade classroom.

(ESP) Special Education

3382  The Exceptional Child. Historical perspective of special education and the exceptional child with emphasis on children with speech handicaps, mentally retarded children, children with auditory and visual impairments, children who have behavioral disorders, and children who have neurological, orthopedic, and/or other health impaired disabilities. A minimum of 12 clock-hours of observation in a special education setting is required. B

4650  Teacher Aide Practicum. Required of public school teacher aides to complete requirements for certification in EC-4. Requires current employment in the certification area, having completed a minimum of 1½ years in that position. The practicum will be no less than one semester. D

4660  Student Teaching in the Special Education. Teaching under supervision in the elementary and/or secondary school for twelve weeks in an all-day assignment. Includes weekly seminar to address special topics. PRE: Admission to Educator Certification. Fee $240. B

(ESS) Exercise and Sport Sciences

1200  Personal Fitness and Wellness. Study of the health related aspects of fitness and the assessment of personal profiles leading to the development of positive attitudes in lifelong fitness. Fee $50.

1201  Introduction to Exercise and Sport Sciences. Introductory survey of the field of exercise and sport sciences, including a historical review and current employment opportunities.

1270  First Aid and CPR. Study of basic principles of first aid and CPR techniques. Fee $50.

2142  Theory and Practice IV. Theory and practice of fundamental movement activities.

2310  Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries. Study of diagnosis, treatment, and care of athletic related injuries. Fee $50.

2312  Team, Individual, and Outdoor Educational Activities. Provides developmentally appropriate teaching methodology, curriculum development, and refinement of teaching skills for team, individual, and outdoor activities.

2314  Human Movement. Integrated analysis of the science of human movement mechanism related to the influences on performance in sport, work, and the activities of daily living. Includes basic biomechanical factors and concepts. PRE: BIO 2401. Fee $50.

3301  Advanced Care of Athletic Injuries. Advanced study of diagnosis, treatment, and care of athletic injuries. PRE: ESS 2310 and BIO 2401 or consent of instructor. Fee $50.

3321  Management of Sport. Detailed examination into leadership effectiveness and group cohesion in exercise and sport science. Students will be able to identify, differentiate, and assess leadership effectiveness and group cohesion across the discipline.

3324  Sport in Society. Provides an analysis of sport and leisure in the United States from the standpoint of its socioeconomic impact and relevance, contemporary social organization, social psychological processes, and issues such as violence, inequality, sports and education, and social values.

3332  Foundations of Secondary Physical Education. Methods and materials of planning and instructing physical education classes in secondary schools.

3335  Exercise Psychology. Concepts in psychology applied to individual involvement in exercise. Emphasis on theoretical models and methods for assessing exercise adherence. Investigation of methods and strategies for behavior intervention and program development to promote adherence to exercise programs.

3340  Motor Learning and Control. Study of the fundamental concepts and applications of motor learning and control. Its primary focus is on movement behaviors that can be observed directly and on the many factors that affect the quality of these performances and the ease with which they can be learned. Fee $50.

3341  Measurement and Evaluation in Exercise Physiology. Use of laboratory, field, and software tools to accurately collect, analyze, and interpret relevant and authentic data.

3356  Sport Psychology. Concepts in psychology as applied to individual involvement in sport and other forms of competitive activity. Emphasis on motivation, stress management, personality theory, performance enhancement, and group dynamics.

3365  Outdoor Education Programs. Management issues and techniques of outdoor programs.

3371  Physiology of Exercise. Study of the effects of physical exercise upon the major systems of the body. PRE: BIO 2401 and BIO 2402. Fee $50.

4230, 4330, 4430 Internship in Exercise and Sport Sciences. Practical experience in the selected area of specialization.

4300  Foundations of Elementary Physical Education. Methods and materials of planning and instructing physical education classes in elementary schools.

4301  Biomechanics. Study of components of forces applied to the body during various sport motions and exercise. Knowledge of forces applied to various joints and muscles during sport and exercise enhances teaching skill and technique as well as understanding the role of forces in natural motion and injury. PRE: ESS 2314. Fee $50.

4302  Therapeutic Rehabilitation and Modalities. Principles of therapeutic exercise, the essentials of a rehabilitation program, physiological effects, and therapeutic indications associated with the use of standard modalities. PRE: ESS 2310 and BIO 2401 or consent of instructor.

4322  Sport and Exercise Nutrition. Study of the metabolism of food by various tissues of the body and its relation to exercise. The role of diet in the development and treatment of some chronic diseases will be discussed along with the application of nutritional principles to enhance human performance. Fee $50.

4350  Principles of Strength and Conditioning. Fundamental concepts of training program design for both apparently healthy and athletic populations. Includes competencies required for the NSCA’s Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) examination. Fee $50.

4361  Exercise Testing and Prescription I. Physiological theory and its practical application to exercise testing and prescription. Includes competencies required for ACSM Exercise Specialist exam. PRE: ESS 3371. Fee $50.

4362  Exercise Testing and Prescription II. Continuation of ESS 4361. Includes competencies required for the ACSM Exercise Specialist examination. PRE: ESS 4361. Fee $50.

4380  Senior Research. Capstone course which allows the student to present both written and oral findings related to a selected research topic within Exercise and Sport Sciences.

4382  Life Span Motor Development. Study of development in the psychomotor domain. Areas of emphasis include learning theories physiological bases of skill behavior, the state of the performer, and application of instructional techniques in motor learning and skill performance.

(ESS) Activity Courses

1101, 2101 Aerobics for Women.

1102, 2102 Jogging.

1103, 2103 Rock Climbing.

1105, 2105 Bowling.

1107, 2107 Golf.

1108, 2108 Fitness Through Self-Defense.

1112, 2112 Skiing.

1115, 2115 Weight Training.

1123, 2123 Bicycling.

1125, 2125 Backpacking and Camping.

1126, 2126 Spinning.

(FIN) Finance

2301  Personal Financial Planning. Budgeting, management of credit, investments, and estate planning. F

3300  Corporation Finance I. Introductory course in financial policies of corporations with attention to capital markets and investment theory. PRE: ECO 2301 and ACC 2301. B

3301  Real Estate Fundamentals. Examination of the real estate market, including operational, legal, financial, investment, and other aspects. Consideration is given to urban land use and land use planning. F

4302  Corporation Finance II. Advanced study of selected topics in business finance including leasing, mergers, business failure, capital budgeting, capital structure, and others. PRE: FIN 3300. S

4309  Investments. Study of personal and business investments. Stock markets, futures markets, money and capital markets, and portfolio analysis. PRE: FIN 3300. S

4311  International Trade and Finance. Study of the impact of the international environment on the American economy and individual business enterprises, including a consideration of international monetary problems, international trade and its financing and multinational enterprise. PRE: ECO 2301. F

4315  Financial Statement Analysis. Advanced study of financial topics specifically related to financial statements. Includes analysis of financial statements focusing on ratio, comparative, and trend analysis. PRE: FIN 3300. F

(FOL) Foreign Language

1301  American Sign Language I. Introduces basics of American Sign Language (ASL) for students having little or no previous knowledge of ASL. Readiness for learning is approached by visual-gestural communication techniques, visual discrimination, and visual memory exercises. ASL questions, commands, and other simple sentence structures are introduced to develop rudimentary conversational skills in ASL. Information about the deaf community and deaf culture is introduced.

1302  American Sign Language II. Continued development of American Sign Language (ASL) skills with primary focus on refining the use of basic ASL sentence types. Classifiers, spatial referencing, pluralization, and temporal and distributional aspects are introduced. Routine communicative functions of the language: asking, requesting, providing clarification, giving and asking for directions are learned. Additional information about the deaf community and deaf culture is included.

1401  Beginning Spanish I. This introductory course develops reading, writing, listening, and oral communicative skills. The class is conducted primarily in Spanish. No previous knowledge of the language is required, but 1-2 years of high school Spanish are recommended. B

1402  Beginning Spanish II. This introductory course further develops the reading, writing, listening, and oral communicative skills covered in FOL 1401. Successful completion of this course is a pre-requisite for FOL 2301. This course will be conducted primarily in Spanish. B

2301  Intermediate Spanish I. Emphasizes conversation, reading, and composition. Active use of Spanish is encouraged in the classroom. PRE: FOL 1401 and 1402. Lab required. F

2302  Intermediate Spanish II. Continuation of 2301. PRE: same as for 2301. Lab required. S

3301  Introduction to Spanish American Life and Literature. Survey of the history, literature, and culture of Latin America. PRE:  FOL 2301 and 2302, or 14 hours credit by examination. Class is conducted in Spanish. F

3302  Introduction to Spanish Life and Literature. Study of the history, literature and cultural heritage of  Spain. Class is conducted in Spanish. S

3311  Hispanic Culture and Communication. Beginning Spanish introduced in the first half of the course and second focuses on historical/cultural development of Hispanics in the U. S. English readings explore issues of race, ethnicity, and integration, as well as Hispanic contributions to life in the U. S. F

4301  Survey of Spanish Literature. Study of masterpieces of the literature of Spain from its origins to contemporary times. PRE: FOL 3301 and 3302. F

4302  Survey of Spanish-American Literature. Study of masterpieces of the literature of Latin America from its origins to contemporary times. PRE: FOL 3301 and 3302. S

4306  Advanced Grammar and Composition. Study of Spanish grammar with assignment of original compositions on topics of current interest. PRE: FOL 3301 and 3302. F

4360  Senior Seminar. Emphasizes improvement in understanding and speaking Spanish. PRE: FOL 3301 and 3302. S

(GEG) Geography

2300  Regional Geography of the World. Introduction to the spatial distribution of the human and physical geographic phenomena of the world within a regional framework. Topics of regional focus include the spatial distribution of physical factors such as geomorphology, relief, climate, and vegetation, and human factors such as economic, cultural, and political geography. S, FE

3342  Regional Geography of the U.S. and Canada. Introduction to the spatial distribution of the human and physical geographic phenomena of the U.S. and Canada. Topics include the spatial distribution of physical factors such as geomorphology, relief, climate, and vegetation, and human factors such as economic, cultural, and political geography. FO

(GOV) Government

2301  National Government. Introduction to the Constitution, framework, and organization of the American political system, including federalism, political parties, elections, and interest groups. B

2302  Texas State and Local Government. Introduction to the Texas state and local political system and comparison to state and local government throughout the United States. B

3313  Religion, Morality, and Politics. Examines conceptions of the soul, morality, and the political order, with emphasis on the place of religion in the American system. SE

3314  Comparative Politics and Development. Political culture, party systems, government institutions and political behavior in leading industrialized countries and selected lesser countries with a focus on comparative theories in political science. SO

3323  American Foreign Policy and International Relations. Past and contemporary theories of international relations, the struggle for power, propaganda, diplomacy, international organizations, and an overview of American foreign policy. D

3325  History of Law. Considers legal traditions from the ancient world through the early modern period and their contribution to modern legal philosophies and institutions. D

3331  U.S. and Texas Public Policy. Overview of public policy making in the U.S. and Texas with an emphasis on the major policy issues of the present. D

3341  American Public Administration. Survey of the field of public administration, principles of administrative organization, and the structure of government charged with the carrying out of public policy. D

4305  Constitutional Law. Analysis of Supreme Court decisions, showing their political, moral, and psychological impact on American society, including changing conceptions of the role of the Court in American society. FO

4306  Political Theory. Exploration of ancient, medieval, and modern political theories and their relationship to contemporary ideas, ideologies, and controversies. S

4380  Senior Research. Independent study designed for advanced students who will do some original research, give some reports, attend informal lectures, and participate in group discussions about a particular field of study.

(HIS) History

Prerequisite for advanced HIS courses: Completion of 6 hours from HIS 1315 and HIS 1316 or HIS 2301 and HIS 2302.

1315  World History and Geography I. World history from the beginning of civilization to 1600 with a related emphasis on world geography. F

1316  World History and Geography II. World history from 1600 to the present with a related emphasis on world geography. S

2301  History of the United States I. History of the United States from the discovery of America to 1877. B

2302  History of the United States II. History of the United States from 1877 to the present. B

2350  History of Texas. Political, economic, and cultural developments in Texas from earliest settlement to the present. B

3310  History of Asia. Discussion of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as the Asian nations emerge as the population and economic centers of the world. Containing three of the four most highly populated nations in the world, Asia grows in importance and influence in world affairs from the age of foreign control through independence and acceptance of its nations as world powers.

3313  Colonial America. History of the United States from the colonization of Jamestown through the period of the early Republic. F

3315  Jeffersonian and Jacksonian America. History of the United States from the founding of the Federalist and Republican Parties through the era of antebellum expansion, culminating with the Mexican-American War. F

3320  History of Africa. Moving from the heyday of colonialism, an examination of the struggle of the African nations for independence and their achievements in developing stable governments in the face of racial, tribal, social, and economic problems.

3323  Ancient History. Things your mummy never told you, from the rise of Mesopotamia and Egypt and the Greek democracies through the fall of Rome in 476. FE

3325  History Pedagogy. Method and design for the effective teaching of standards-aligned history classes. Emphasis on the development of lessons, materials, and assessments.  Introduction to pedagogical strategies specific to the discipline of history. FE or D

3330  History of Latin America. Examination of Latin America emerging from the Napoleonic wars as struggling nations, attempting to maintain their independence from European and North American influences. Discussion includes the rise of Latin American nationalism and the struggle of various Latin American nations to find a place in the sun outside of the shadow of U.S. and European political struggles.

4302  Civil War and Reconstruction. Examination of the course of events from the antebellum period through reconstruction, including political, social, cultural, military, and economic developments. SE

4305  American Society and Religion: the Great Leveling, 1790-1920. Study of the process by which religious elites in America gave sway to evangelicalism in the aftermath of the First Great Awakening. Throughout the 19th century, American religious experience was dominated by revivalism, millennialism, and utopianism. Considers these movements and their consequences in the social and political context of the times.

4313  The Gilded Age through the Jazz Age. History of the United States’ modernization, from 1877 through 1929. FO

4314  Recent America. History of United States from the onset of the Great Depression to the present. SO

4325  History of England to 1714. Survey of the development of England from pre-history to the first Hanoverian king of England. FO

4326  Modern Europe: 1715 to Present. Survey of European history from Louis XV to yesterday’s newspaper. SE

4360  Senior Seminar. Examines and verifies research and writing skills of seniors specializing in history. D

(HON) Honors

1302  Writing About Literature. Examines critical thinking and writing, where students reading, discuss, and write about literature. Readings include great texts in non-fiction essays and speeches, short stories, poems, novels, and films. F

1304  Science and Man. Emphasis on major science topics that have impacted the human population. Includes a historical perspective and introduces the integration of scientific knowledge to solve problems. S

2301  Making Connections: Literature and Life. Drawing from classical literature primarily in the western tradition, Gilgamesh through Paradise Lost, the course seeks to understand the human condition as widely varying cultures and worldviews have defined it. F

2303  Latin I. Introduction to Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary with readings from writings of classical authors. Attention is given to aspects of Roman culture that influenced Western thought and to the Latin influence on English.

2305  Latin II. Continuation of introduction to Latin grammar, syntax, and vocabulary with appropriate readings.

2306  History of the United States II. History of the United States from 1877 to the present, with an emphasis on formative trends, pivotal individuals and events, and critical methodology.

2310  Macroeconomics. Introduction to the economic way of thinking, with emphasis on macroeconomics. Topics include basic economic principles, including scarcity, trade-offs, and opportunity cost; fundamental economic models, including the circular flow of economic activity, production possibilities, and supply-demand analysis; the distinction between market and command economic systems; rudimentary macroeconomic concepts concerning the measurement, causes, and promotion of economic growth and price stability; and differing views on the macroeconomic impacts of fiscal and monetary policies.

2354  Honors Seminar. Interdisciplinary study of various topics and issues, with attention to discussion, research, writing, critical thinking, and integration of student major.

3302  Bible as Literature. Advanced introduction to the Bible as literature with an emphasis on the nature of biblical narrative. Constructions, conventions, and techniques of biblical composition. Issues of hermeneutical and narrative criticism are addressed with an evaluation of various strategies for reading and contemporary ethical implications.

3304  Old Testament Seminar. Examines Old Testament, with an emphasis on themes, history, literary structure, and sociology of biblical texts and periods. Specific courses may vary according to professor specialization or research interest.

3340  Communication for the Professional. Increase skills and awareness concerning communication in professional environments. Opportunities to acquire and practice elements necessary, including theory, research, presentation and evaluation of communication. F

3354  Honors Seminar. Interdisciplinary study of various topics and issues, with attention to discussion, research, writing, critical thinking, and integration of student major.

4320  Leadership. Examination of mission, values, vision, principles of leadership, and leadership awareness in the context of value-centered leadership. Discusses leadership practices in both public and private organizations with a heavy emphasis on student-led discussions, presentations, and papers. Students will develop their own leadership skills as well as effective influence strategies in interpersonal relations. S

4330  Internship/Study Abroad Internship. Internship or study abroad internship.

4354  Honors Seminar. Interdisciplinary study of various topics and issues, with attention to discussion, research, writing, critical thinking, and integration of student major.

4380  Senior Research. Capstone course of the honors experience, where students in or near their last semester at the university conduct library, laboratory, and/or field research on an issue or problem in their major field of study. Course requirements include the development of an annotated bibliography, the formation and articulation of a thesis in a research paper, and the presentation and defense of this thesis. Students in the performance arts, the natural and physical sciences, and some professional programs may substitute appropriate research and presentation components, as approved by the Honors Director and the major advisor. B

(HSC) Human Sciences

2310  Lifespan Human Development. Physical and psychological development of the individual from infancy through adulthood. B

2330  Love, Courtship, and Marriage. Principles involved in building a healthy marriage. B

3300  Child and Adolescent Development. Study of physical, intellectual, social, and psychological development from birth through adolescence. B

3304  Adolescent Development. Application of developmental theory and cultural contexts to the understanding of persons in transition to adulthood. B

3305  Children, Families and Social Policy. Examines societal forces that impact the family such as the child welfare system, the development of laws and public policy, and the relationship between government policy and family life. F

3313  The Family. Principles involved in developing a successful family throughout all the family’s phases. Includes a study of healthy and unhealthy relationships in the family. F

3315  Ethics in the Helping Professions. Focuses on the professional practices and ethics in the helping profession as well as the legal aspects of providing professional services in helping professions. Students will learn how to manage themselves and their professional practice so as to be both legal and ethical. F

3322  Gender and Sexuality. Human gender and sexuality from a life cycle perspective, with an emphasis on developmental, familial, and societal factors that influence gender and sexuality. S

3323  Family Violence. Study of the theoretical issues, both past and present, regarding family violence in order to provide the student with an understanding of the salient issues. Attention given to the impact family violence has on the victim and society, legal aspects of family violence, key factors associated with recognition of family violence, and pertinent research focusing on the subject. F

3324  Marital and Family Therapy. Introduction to the major models of marriage and family relations, dysfunctions and techniques of intervention. S

3326  Family Stress, Crisis, and Resilience. Investigation of the stresses and crises experienced by families and their members. Emphasis will be given to identifying strategies for cultivating family resilience. S

3328  Parenting. Study of parenting practices, parenting rights and responsibilities. The course will emphasize the development of healthy parent and child relationships and study how parenting roles change over the life cycle. S

3350  Social Gerontology. Considerations of aging in the family as related to interpersonal relationships and environmental needs of the elderly. Special emphasis is given to social services for the elderly. F

4323  Family Life Education and Enrichment. Investigation of the contemporary models, methods, and resources associated with family life education and family enrichment. Attention will be given to needs assessments, program design, teaching strategies, and group facilitation skills. F

4324  Family Dynamics of Addiction. Survey of psychological factors and treatment involved in addiction and the impact of abuse on family dynamics, neurology, and biochemistry

4326  Family and Community. Examines the reciprocal relationship between families and major social institutions: government, religion, education, economic, and work place. Emphasis will be given to the impact of law and social policy on families and to the role that community agencies play in serving families. S

4390  Practicum. Participation in a department approved structured and supervised setting to give an introductory experience to the field of human sciences. Each student participating in a field experience must purchase liability insurance through the university. Fee $300.  B

6141  Christian Worldview in Family Education. Examination of the impact of a Christian worldview on individual and family beliefs, interaction, and structure. Consideration will be given to the role of a Christian worldview in family education.

6301  Marital and Family Education. Detailed study of family development and functioning in light of family systems with emphasis on an agency or organizations opportunities to intervene in this context. Same as MIN 6301.

6304  Organizational Leadership. Detailed study of leadership focusing on personal leadership and organizational leadership. Attention will be given to the latest trends and models from administration, organization, and leadership theory. Same as MIN 6304.

6309  Crisis Intervention. Study of crisis in the multiple setting with emphasis on appropriate behaviors and responses to crisis. Applied therapeutic interventions in general and crisis intervention are presented along with strategies to alleviate crisis and deal with crisis aftermath.

6310  Social Development of Individuals and Families. Examination of similarities and differences in conceptions of behavior throughout the lifespan; emphasis on individual development in the context of the family.

6312  Studies in Family Life Education. Analysis of the latest trends and topics of interest in family life education.

6314  Contemporary Issues in Adolescent Development. Latest readings and research in adolescent culture and in youth ministry. The student will be presented with a systems view of youth ministry and its impact on programming. Same as MIN 6315.

6315  Parent Education. Examination of major objectives and the underlying guidance principles in parent-child relations; study of programs and agencies in parent education.

6322  Human Sexuality. Study of human sexuality from a life cycle perspective with an emphasis on developmental, familial, and societal factors that influence individual sexuality.

6323  Family Systems. Extensive introduction to the concepts of family systems theory with application of this theory to family, church, and ministry. Same as MIN 6323.

6324  Family Resource Management. Applications of family financial planning models to decision making and asset resource allocation.

6332  Helping Professions and Public Policy. Public policy, legal, and ethical issues related to families will be addressed with an emphasis on marriage, divorce, custody, adoption, juvenile rights, malpractice, courtroom testimony, competence, and wills and estates.

6333  Ethics in the Helping Professions. Study of ethical decision making in helping professions with an emphasis on understanding ethical codes within the helping professions.

6334  Conflict Resolution. Survey of theory and research in conflict resolution with an emphasis on the student’s developing practical skills to help resolve conflicts within families and organizations.

6340  Human Resources Administration. Study of human resources policies and systems appropriate to public and non-profit human service organizations.

6342  Fundraising and Grant Writing. Study of fundraising options available to human service organizations. Particular emphasis is given to the development of fundraising plans and strategies for human service programs and organizations.

6390  Family Life Education Practicum. Supervised outreach family life education experience in preventative and educational activities, including program development, implementation, evaluation, teaching, training, and research related to individual and family well-being. Comprehensive exam and portfolio review accomplished. Grade of B required for completion.

(HTH) Historical Theology

3311  Christian History and Theology I. Survey of major events, people, historical, and theological developments in Christian history ranging from the post-apostolic period through the waning of the patristic period in the mid-6th century. Required readings will include primary and secondary literature. FO

3322  Christian History and Theology II. Survey of major events, people, and historical/theological developments in Christian history ranging from the early Medieval period through the mid-seventeenth century. Readings include secondary literature but will focus on primary sources. PRE: HTH 3311. SE

4331  Christian History and Theology III. Survey of major events, people, historical, and theological developments in Christian history during the modern period (mid-17th century to the present). Required readings will include primary and secondary literature. PRE: HTH 3322. FO

(HUM) Humanities

2300  Exploring the Human Experience. Study of human culture to understand our cultural roots. Topics include art, music, politics, history, psychology, philosophy, and literature from the Renaissance to the present. SE

4330  Internship. Writing experiences in business context under the direction and supervision of management and faculty, including preparation of a portfolio, narrative essay, and oral presentation. PRE: Senior standing and permission of faculty

4380  Senior Research. Students will work with a committee of two professors, at least one from their area of specialization, and complete a series of research and writing assignments resulting in a long paper and an oral presentation drawn from their area of specialization and illuminating the emphasis of their study. Taken during the senior year. B

(INT) International Studies

2305  International Studies. Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of international studies, examining the cultural, political, economic, and social issues related to the dynamics of globalism.

(IST) Information Systems and Technology

1100  Basic Computer Literacy. Introduction to the operation and use of the microcomputer. Topics include interacting with the graphical user interface, word processing, spreadsheet creation, e-mail, and searching the Internet. B

1350  Programming Logic and Design Tools. Students will learn to confront a problem, take it apart, analyze each step, and design a logical plan to direct the computer to perform the required actions. Students will learn to use current design tools to explain, document, and plan their programming. A simple programming language will be used to test the programs. F

2300  Microcomputer Applications. Studies will develop advanced user skills in Microsoft Office Application Software. B

2311  C++1. Introduction to procedural programming in C++. The C++ language will be used to teach analysis and design, implementation, and testing of software. PRE: IST 1350. F

2314  C #. Study of C# in the .NET framework. PRE: IST 2311. S

2323  Web Programming. Web programming that covers HTML, JavaScript, and the Document Object Model. PRE: IST 1350. S

3300  Advanced Spreadsheet Design. Use of advanced concepts and techniques with a spreadsheet in statistical analysis and information processing and presentation. Microsoft Excel will be used, although the principles apply to any spreadsheet application. B

3321  Visual BASIC. Introduction to programming using visual tools for object oriented programming techniques, using Microsoft Visual Basic. The course will emphasize well-designed, functional programs that incorporate a database. PRE: IST 1350 F 

3322  Visual Basic for Applications. Study of the Visual Basic programming language with special emphasis on the built in power to modify and customize existing Microsoft Office user applications, with hands-on application of the principles discussed. VB Script will be included. PRE: IST 1350. S

3323  Geographic Information Systems. Introduces basic concepts and applications of Geographic Information Systems. Course focuses on GIS reporting, accessing previously gathered data and preparing it for spatial reporting on maps. Opportunity to perform analysis in a variety of content areas and make decisions on real world concerns. F

3324  Java Programming. Object oriented programming using Java for Internet, intranet, and networking applications. PRE: IST 2311. OS

3330  Unix Applications and Administration. Study of the Unix Operating System. PRE: IST 2311.

3332  Networking. Introduction to networking. Basic networking concepts and technologies will be reviewed. Hardware and software issues, including the following, will be explored: LANS, WANS, OSI 7 layer networking model. Students will have hands-on experience in planning and installing an Ethernet network. S

3333  User Support and Help Desk Concepts. Concepts and principles of user support and help desk roles in the corporation. Both techniques of user support and troubleshooting and management of help desk centers will be covered. F

3341  Database Management Systems. Students will develop advanced skills in the design and use of a DBMS. Database components of data models, relational databases and query processing will be emphasized. Fee: $50 F

3351  Web Design. Study of the formal process of organizing and designing effective Web sites. The course will cover HTML XHTML, JavaScript, CSS, and introduction to Dreamweaver, color theory and design. The course includes the production of individual web projects and client based web sites. Fee $50. F

4330  Internship. Work in an area of business utilizing skills developed in the program. PRE: Senior standing and approval of the instructor. B

4333  Network Administration. Network and system administration for local area networks with an emphasis on NT Server 4.0 administration. Principles and procedures will include the areas of resource and user administration, remote administration tools and procedures, multi-protocol clients and network/server security. Students will have hands-on experience with these issues in installing and administering a real network during the course. PRE: IST 3332 F

4340  Network Security. Study of computer system security, computer network security, access control, security assessments and audits, cryptography, and organizational security. PRE: IST 3332. D.

4360  Senior Project. Use and further development of skills and concepts learned in courses taken during the first three years. Students will develop and complete a project for an individual or a community organization or business. PRE: senior status in IST or ISM and approval of the instructor. B

4380  Systems Analysis and Design. Studying all elements of the development and maintenance of an information system, from the first discussions with a user or group of users, to the final full implementation of the IS. PRE: senior status in IST or ISM. S

ChapDesk Practicum

1101, 1102  ChapDesk Customer Service. Fifteen hours of customer service training for computer software and hardware with thirty hours of practical experience working with customers at the ChapDesk.

2101, 2102  ChapDesk Troubleshooting. Fifteen hours of training resolving hardware and software problems with thirty hours of practical experience working problem management at the ChapDesk.

3101  ChapDesk Leadership. Fifteen hours of management training with thirty hours of practical experience leading an incident or problem management team at the ChapDesk.

3102  ChapDesk Leadership. Sixty hours of practical experience leading an incident or problem management team at the ChapDesk.

(LEA) Leadership

6301  Integrative Project in Organizational Leadership. Project that synthesizes the principles of the leadership course into a written integrative document. Capstone course to be taken in the last semester of the program.

6302  Leadership Theory and Practice. Comprehensive study of leadership as a phenomenon and its impact on the organizational behavior or individuals. Major theories of leadership are examined and integrated to various internal and external organizational factors. Students learn to think critically about the leadership phenomenon and about the boundary conditions of leadership theories. Topics linked to leadership include gender, power, ethics, job design and motivation, personality, national culture, and leader development.

6303  Strategic Planning. Formulation and interpretation of policy, executive responsibility, decision making, administrative practices and business ethic. This is a writing intensive course and case analysis will be the primary learning tool.

6304  Leading Organizations. Theoretical and practical review of the meaningful difference that leadership can make in the aspects of organizational life. Particular attention is given to how leaders generate organizational contributions to society through shared vision and values, acting as change agents, sharing power, engaging constituents, and moving toward the fulfillment of the organizational mission.

6305  Conflict Management for Leaders. Practical examination of the role that team building and management, together with conflict management, play in leadership. Particular attention is given to various approaches to conflict management and practical skill development in negotiating, forging shared vision, team role assignment, and effective small-group and individual communication, all in routine and crisis situations.

6306  Leaders and Values. Addresses specific ethical issues which leaders confront, especially issues related to power, influence, manipulation, service and personal character.

6307  Non-Profit Leadership. Examination of leadership challenges of non-profit organizations as well as its distinctive theoretical components.

6308  Emotional Intelligence. Core competencies of emotional intelligence, a necessary tool for leadership success.

6312  Servant Leadership. Focuses on the acquisition and execution of the most critical competencies of leading by serving first: advanced empathy, persuasion, foresight, humility, collaboration, and the ethical use of power.

6314  Leading Organizational Change. Theory and practice of organizational transformation and the leadership necessary to help change efforts succeed.

6318  Leading Teams. Study of virtual teams, team management, team dynamics, working together, problem solving, team conflict, measuring team performance, and team building techniques.

6320  Communication for Leaders. Theoretical and practical examination of the role that communication plays in effective leadership. Study of strategies for improvement and success in developing, delivering and sustaining effective communication in organizations.

6322  Global and Cultural Leadership. Experiential study of the theory, practical challenges, and successful practice of leaders in cross-cultural or global settings. Examine leaders on a variety of levels in different cultures. May be combined with an international or interregional travel experience.

(MAT) Mathematics

0200  Directed Studies in Math. Review of basic mathematics. Topics covered include ratio and proportion, percent, and arithmetic operations with whole numbers, integers, fractions, and decimals. Elective credit only. This class cannot be audited. P/F. D

1302  Intermediate Algebra. Polynomial arithmetic, solving linear equations, inequalities, factoring and linear systems. B

1310  College Mathematics. Survey of mathematics, which includes the topics of reasoning, basic set theory, introductory logic, mathematical systems and number theory. D

1311  College Algebra. Basic algebra, linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, functions, and systems of equations. B

1312  Trigonometry. Trigonometry functions, identities, and applications. F

1313  Pre-Calculus. Elementary functions of calculus: linear, quadratic, polynomial, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. B

1316  Business Calculus. Introduction to basic differential and integral calculus with business applications. PRE: MAT 1311. B

1402  Analytical Geometry and Calculus I. Functions, limits, continuity, differentiation, and definite integrals. S

1403  Analytical Geometry and Calculus II. Trigonometric and exponential functions, techniques and applications of integration, conic sections and polar coordinates. PRE: MAT 1402. F

2404  Analytical Geometry and Calculus III. Vectors, series, partial differentiation, and multiple integration, and line integrals. PRE: MAT 1403. S

3302  College Geometry. Study of Euclidean geometry by both the synthetic and metric development, introduction to analytical geometry. Pre:  MAT 1311 or above. S

3303  Probability and Statistics. Elementary probability, random variables, testing of hypotheses, estimation, regression, and Markov processes. B

3305  Foundations of Mathematics I. Covers sets, logic, mathematical proofs, the real numbers from an axiomatic approach, cardinality of finite and infinite sets and number theory. F

3306  Differential Equations. Solution of ordinary differential equations with applications. PRE: MAT 1403. S

3350  Linear Algebra. Matrices, systems of equations, vector spaces, and linear transformations. PRE: MAT 1402. SO

3351  Intermediate Analysis. Sequences, limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals. PRE: MAT 2404. FO

3353  Numerical Analysis. Introduction to numerical methods and analysis involving non-linear equations, interpolation polynomials, numeric differentiation and integration, curve fitting, and approximation of functions. PRE: MAT 2404 or consent of instructor. FE

4350  Foundations of Mathematics II. Topics related to teaching of mathematics, including recent trends and developments, ideas and methods. D

4351  Modern Algebra. Concepts and methods of abstract algebra: groups, rings, integral domains, and fields. PRE: MAT 3305. D

(MGT) Management

3300  Principles of Management. Basic functions of management:  planning, organizing, leading, controlling. Managerial roles, skills, and ethical responsibilities. B

3301  Organizational Behavior and Theory. Examines management of the complex relationships within an organization. Concepts of organizational theory are discussed.

3311  Management Information Systems. Study of the use of information technology to support and promote organizational goals. PRE: IST 3300.

3320  Project Management. Explores the dimensions and elements of project management; concepts, methodologies, strategies, and structures. Attention will be given to cost controls, teamwork, and quality management. Students may focus on general business project management or information technology. PRE: IST 2300

4306  Human Resource Management. Focuses on the strategic role of human resources management in an organization. Specific attention is given to recruitment, selection, training, development, and compensation of employees from a managerial viewpoint. PRE: junior or senior standing. S

(MIL) Military Science

1101  Introduction to Military Subjects I. Designed to acquaint students with the basic customs, courtesies, and traditions of the US Army. Instruction includes training on leadership, written and oral communications, physical fitness, and general military skills. (1:1.5) F  Fee $15

1102  Introduction to Military Subjects II. Provides practical application of individual tactical techniques and skills. Classroom instruction and lab training focuses on applied leadership and management techniques from the Army perspective. (1:1.5) S Fee $15

2201  Study of Military Organization and Affairs. Continues development of basic leadership and critical problem solving skills. Designed to build proficiency and confidence in the student’s own leadership abilities. PRE: MILS 1101 and 1102 or consent of instructor. (2:1.5) F  Fee $30

2202  Military Leadership and Basic Soldier Skills. Leadership training, with emphasis on Army values, ethics, operations and tactics, general military skills, and physical fitness. PRE: MILS 2201 or consent of instructor. (2:1.5) S Fee $30

2203  Individual Studies in Military Subjects. Independent studies in military organization, affairs, traditions, and basic soldier skills, under the guidance of a MILS instructor. PRE: Consent of the department chairman. BD Fee $30

3301  Leadership and Problem Solving I. Designed to prepare the student for successful service as a US Army Officer. Examines the Army decision-making and operation orders process, provides a basic understanding of small-unit tactics, and improves the student’s understanding of basic leadership skills. Physical fitness and field training emphasized. PRE: Basic training, lower level MILS course, or consent of department chairman. (3:1.5) F Fee $45

3302  Leadership and Problem Solving II. Designed to prepare the student for successful service as a US Army Officer. Expands upon the student’s knowledge of small-unit tactics, leadership techniques, and basic soldiering skills. Focuses on the employment of platoon and squad size units and practices the military application of land navigation and basic rifle marksmanship. Physical fitness and field training emphasized. PRE: MILS 3301 or consent of department chairman. (3:1.5) S Fee $45

3303  Individual Studies in Military Leadership and Planning. Independent studies in military leadership and planning, under the guidance of a MILS instructor. PRE: Consent of the department chairman. BD Fee $45

4301  Leadership and Management I. Instruction concentrates on Army operations and training management, communications and leadership skills, and the transition from cadet to Second Lieutenant. This includes focused study of the Army’s training management system, coordination of activities with staffs, and the development of leadership counseling skills. PRE: MILS 3301 and 3302 or consent of department chairperson. (3:1.5) F Fee $45

4302  Leadership and Management II. Students focus on preparation for commissioning and active or reserve duty. Subject relevant to all Army officers covered in a seminar format. PRE: MILS 4301 or consent of department chairperson. (3:1.5) S Fee $45

4303  Individual Studies in Military Leadership and Planning. Independent studies in military leadership and planning, under the guidance of a MILS instructor. PRE: Consent of the department chairman. BD Fee $45

(MIN) Ministry

2311  Mission of God. Introduction to missions, broadly construed as Missio Dei. Teaches that ministry, whether the ministry of preaching, shepherding, evangelizing, counseling, or scholarship, should be in service to the mission of God. Students will be reminded that bringing social justice and healing to a broken world is central to God’s mission in the world and should be central to each of our respective ministries. S

2322  Christian Spiritual Formation. Introduction to Christian spiritual formation traditions from the first to the twenty first century, with an emphasis on classical devotional literature, practices, and themes. PRE: Major, Junior standing. S

3302  Family Ministry. Study of models for ministry to families in churches, with an emphasis on a systems approach to family ministry. Life cycle issues, church programming for families, and preventative planning will be studied. Cross listed as YFM 3302. F

3368  Intermediate Studies in Ministry. Supervised intermediate research and writing in a specific area of the ministry. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. PRE: permission of instructor. D

4090  Practicum. Supervised internship in student area of ministry, culminating in a final, written report. Recommended for summer completion with fall enrollment. F

4302  Preaching Biblical Genres. Application of varied preaching forms to a selected biblical book or genres. PRE: BIB 2303. S

4331  Spiritual Direction and Worship. Intended to broaden awareness of spiritual life with an emphasis on the cooperative and corporate spiritual experiences. Particular attention is given to the helping roles of ministers in the spiritual lives of others, and on congregational structures and patterns that support the life of spirituality and worship. F

4342  Christian Ministry. Designed to help biblical studies majors move from the academic world into various ministry settings. Introduction to aspects of pastoral counseling and leadership development. Instruction on practical ministry situations, including funerals, weddings, and conflict. S

4368  Advanced Studies in Ministry. Supervised advanced research and writing in a specific ministry area. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. PRE: permission of instructor. D

6062  Comprehensive Examination. Comprehensive, written examination for a graduate degree. To be taken during the last term.

6301  Family Ministry. Study of family development and functioning in light of family systems with emphasis on the church’s opportunity to minister in this context.

6302  Hermeneutics. Study of the history of the application of hermeneutics to the biblical text with an emphasis on the current questions in biblical interpretation.

6303  Spiritual Formation. Study of Christian spirituality and the formation process rising from interaction with the Holy Spirit of God. Focuses on spiritual models, the spirituality of the minister, and the spiritual formation, which takes place through individual discipleship and in congregational settings.

6304  Church Leadership. Study of church leadership focusing on personal leadership and congregational leadership. Attention will be given to the latest trends and models from administration, organization, and leadership theory.

6305  Preaching. Principles and practices of homiletics with an emphasis on sermon preparation and delivery.

6306  Advanced Preaching. Sermon development with emphasis on the study of expository, inductive, and narrative preaching.

6307  Preaching Biblical Genres. Application of varied preaching forms to a selected book or genres of the Bible.

6309  Christian Counseling. Application of counseling approaches to crisis situations in individual, family, and congregational life.

6312  Studies in Ministry. Study and analysis of the latest trends and topics in ministry. D

6315  Advanced Studies in Youth and Family Ministry. Study of youth and family ministry in light of current research and cultural trends.

6318  Church Growth. Study in evangelistic and congregational principles current with the latest literature addressing culture and congregation.

6323  Family Systems. Introduction to the concepts of family systems theory with application of this theory to family, church, and ministry.

6325  Campus Ministry. Study in the latest trends and developments in campus ministry with emphasis on outreach to university students.

6328  Capstone and Comprehensive Examination. Capstone course where Master of Divinity students demonstrate achievement of program goals and objectives. Includes written assignments, oral presentations, and comprehensive examinations.

6330  Internship I. Supervised internship in a specific ministry setting, including preparatory readings, practice in ministry skills, written reports, and ministry assessment.

6360  Internship II. Supervised internship in a specific ministry setting outside of the minister’s primary ministry context, such as hospice, community outreach, pregnancy counseling center, hospital chaplaincy. Include preparatory readings, practice in ministry skills, written reports, and ministry assessment.

6390  Practicum in Family Ministry. Supervised practicum in a family ministry setting, including preparatory readings, practice in ministry skills, written reports, ministry assessment, and family life education.

(MIS) Missions

2305  Theology and Mission. Considers the theological meaning and importance of worship, prayer, and suffering in being a blessing to all nations. SO

2311  Introduction to Missions. Study of mission needs, principles, and practices, as well as the missionary’s life and work in the field. Surface introductions on motivation for mission, message of mission, cultural adaptation, worldview, contextualization, church planting, and team relationships. F

2322  Missionary Anthropology. Culture, its different aspects, and how each component affects the identity of people in community. American culture will be examined in an effort to learn how to examine and understand other cultures. S

3301  Ministry to Contemporary Culture. Examination of the church’s role in shaping and being shaped by cultural trends in Western society. FO

3311  Communicating Christ Today. Investigates the power of narrative in our personal and communal lives. Students will explore their own story, the story of the Christian church, and the place of these and other stories in the great narrative of God’s redeeming the cosmos. SE

4312  Mission Team Dynamics. Study and preparation related to specific mission team relationships and goals. Emphases will include prayer preparation, strategic planning, covenant development, and family concerns. PRE: permission of instructor. SE

4090  Practicum. Supervised internship in a specific missions area. Includes preparatory readings, practice in ministry skills, written reports, and final assessment. Recommended for summer completion, with formal fall enrollment. PRE: Senior standing or chair approval. D

6312  Missions. Analysis of the latest trends and topics in missions.

(MUS) Music

1000  Piano Proficiency Test. Demonstration of piano proficiency after four consecutive semesters of piano private lessons. Must pass test prior to beginning student teaching.

1105  Sight Singing and Ear Training I. Music literacy through ear training, sight-singing, and dictation, taken concurrently with MUS 1305 Elementary Music Theory. F

1106  Sight Singing and Ear Training II. Music literacy through ear training, sight-singing, and dictation, taken concurrently with MUS 1306 Elementary Music Theory II. S

1123  Class Piano I. Beginning piano for students not specializing in the instrument. Students will receive two one-hour class lessons each week. D

1124  Class Piano II. Continuation of 1123. PRE: 1123 or equivalent. D

1203  Language Diction I. Functional study of diction in English and Italian. Students will learn to use pronunciation guides, transcribe songs, and demonstrate their skills with languages by singing songs in these languages. FO

1204  Language Diction II. Functional study of diction in German and French. PRE: MUS 1203. SE

1208  Fundamentals of Music Theory. Introduction to music theory, focusing on the basics of pitch, rhythm, key signatures, scales, intervals and basic triads with basic piano skills necessary for proficiency in Elementary Music Theory. Actual requirement to be determined by placement exam administered at the beginning of the first semester of enrollment as a music major. F

1301  Music Literature. Survey of music literature from 1450-present. Required of all music majors. Also serves as an introductory course appropriate for anyone wishing to study music appreciation. Emphasizes music listening skills accompanied by historical information. S

1305  Elementary Music Theory I. Music theory consisting of part-writing, sight-singing, keyboard, and aural skills. F

1306  Elementary Music Theory II. Continuation of 1305. PRE: 1305, 1105. S

2000  Music Seminar. Weekly meeting of music majors for performance and instruction. B

2105  Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training I. Music literacy through ear training, sight-singing, and dictation, coinciding with MUS 2305 Advanced Music Theory, FO

2106  Advanced Sight Singing and Ear Training II. Music literacy through ear training, sight-singing, dictation, and transcription, coinciding with MUS 2306 Form, Analysis and Advanced Music Theory, SE

2129  Clarinet and Saxophone. Survey of woodwind performance practices, literature, and history while learning basic technique on the clarinet and saxophone.

2130  High Brass. Survey of high brass performance practices, literature, and history while learning basic technique on the trumpet and french horn.

2131  Low Brass. Survey of low brass performance practices, literature, and history while learning basic technique on trombone, euphonium, and tuba.

2132  Percussion. Survey of percussion practices, literature, and history while learning basic technique on various percussion instruments.

2133  String Methods. Survey of string performance practices, literature, and history while learning basic technique on violin, viola, cello, and bass.

2134  Flute and Double Reed. Survey of flute and double reed performance practices, literature, and history while learning basic technique on the flute, oboe, and bassoon.

2139  Instrumental Methods for Vocal Majors. Study of teaching, playing, and care of string, woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments. Survey course intended for vocal music education majors. Must complete this course before enrolling in MUS 3230.

2305  Advanced Music Theory. Continuation of 1306. PRE: MUS 1306, 1106. FO

2306  Form, Analysis and Advanced Music Theory. Continuation of 2305 with introduction to current techniques. Emphasis on form and analysis and taken concurrently with MUS 2106. SE

3300  Survey of the Music of Worship. Change course description to: Equips students to serve in their churches as worship leaders, active participants of worship committees, or in other capacities pertaining to worship.  Includes an overview of the history of church music, a study of the impact of music on a worship assembly, a discussion of Biblical criteria for music as a part of worship, and an overview of contemporary worship practices across the various Christian denominations.  Specific expertise and experience in music is not required. D

3303  Music History I. Chronological study of music history and literature from classical antiquity to 1685. FE

3304  Music History II. Chronological study of music history and literature from 1685 to the present. SO

3305  Vocal Pedagogy. Survey of the vocal mechanism and the breathing apparatus and their interdependence. Teaching techniques in phonation, resonance, register, articulation, and breathing. Includes a study of the literature or standard operatic repertoire from the 17th-20th centuries from Italy, France, Germany, England, and the United States. SO

3306  Piano Literature. Chronological study of classical keyboard literature from the 18th-20th centuries, approached by style period, composer, and pedagogical value. D

3307  Piano Pedagogy. Review of current piano methods, observation of privately operated studios, class piano labs, and opportunities for practice teaching. D

3208  Marching Band Techniques. Methods and techniques of organizing and directing a school band program by focusing on history, planning, writing, and rehearsing of a marching band. D

3209  Concert Band Techniques. Methods and techniques of organizing and directing a school band program by focusing on rehearsing, performing, and historical aspects of wind band literature.

3230  Orchestration. Ranges, transpositions, timbres, and individual characteristics of band and orchestra instruments through experience in scoring for small ensembles, full band, and orchestra.

4000  Senior Recital. Senior recital. To be taken concurrently with the final semester of private instrumental or vocal study; provides an accompanist if needed, special lighting, recording, and programs for the senior recital. B

4105  Advanced Instrumental Conducting. Development of advanced conducting and rehearsal techniques for instrumental ensembles. Emphasis will be placed on the study of stylistic instrumental literature. Students will experience conducting live rehearsals in university ensembles. Ensemble membership required. PRE: MUS 4204.

4106  Advanced Choral Conducting. Development of conducting and rehearsal techniques for choral or instrumental ensembles. Emphasis will be placed on the study of stylistic choral or instrumental literature. All students will gain experience conducting live rehearsals for active university ensembles. Ensemble membership required. PRE: MUS 4204. D

4204  General Conducting. Study of the development of basic skills for conducting musical organizations with practice in score reading and interpretation. PRE: MUS 1306, 1106. D

4311  Secondary Choral Methods. Study of choral teaching methods on the secondary level, with emphasis on choral literature, particularly those pieces on the UIL lists. D

4312  Secondary Instrumental Methods. Organizational skills, management techniques, and instructional methods necessary for maintenance of a large performance ensemble. D

4320  Elementary Music Methods. Basic elements of music with appropriate techniques for teaching children the principles of singing, playing, listening, and moving to music. B

4360  Senior Seminar. Prepares the music major for the state TExES test by providing a review of music theory, history, and literature. Guest speakers on jazz, folk music, 20th century styles and compositional techniques, electronic music, and musical theatre are included. Required of all music majors with or without Texas Educator Certification as the capstone course. The course must be completed with a grade of at least 70 on the pre-TExES test before one is allowed to take the TExES test, student teach, or graduate with a degree in music. D

(MUS) Music Ensembles

1101, 1102, 2101, 2102, 3101, 3102, 4101, 4102 Chamber Singers. Open to majors and non-majors, subject to approval of director on the basis of vocal qualification, personal attributes, and balance of parts in the organization. B

1103, 1104, 2103, 2104, 3103, 3104, 4103, 4104 Praise Choir. Open to majors and non-majors, subject to approval of director on the basis of vocal qualification, personal attributes, and balance of parts in the organization. Fee for 1103, 2103, 3103, 4103 $60. B

1107, 1108, 2107, 2108, 3107, 3108, 4107, 4108 Symphonic Band. Open to majors and non-majors who play appropriate instruments adequately, subject to director’s approval. B

1109, 1110, 2109, 2110, 3109, 3110, 4109, 4110 Chamber Ensemble. Open to majors and non-majors, especially those who play woodwind, string instruments or piano/harpsichord or other instruments, subject to audition and director approval. B

1135, 1136, 2135, 2136, 3135, 3136, 4135, 4136 Jazz Ensemble. Open to majors and non-majors who play appropriate instruments adequately, subject to director’s approval. B

1141, 1142, 2141, 2142, 3141, 3142, 4141, 4142 University Chorus. Open to majors and non-majors, for the purposes of improving the voice for both solo and choral singing. Fundamentals of proper singing technique will be emphasized, and appropriate literature will be performed in at least one concert per semester. B

1151, 1152, 2151, 2152, 3151, 3152, 4151, 4152 Forte. Vocal ensemble open to all students, subject to director approval. B

(MUS) Music Private Lessons

1111, 1112, 2111, 2112, 3111, 3112, 4111, 4112 Voice. One-credit hour private lessons courses include One-credit hour private lessons courses include one 30-minute private lesson per week. One 30-minute private lesson per week. Fee $300. B

1211, 1212, 2211, 2212, 3211, 3212, 4211, 4212 Voice. Two-credit hour private lesson courses include one 1-hour private lesson per week. Reserved for music majors. Fee $450. B

1113, 1114, 2113, 2114, 3113, 3114, 4113, 4114 Piano. One-credit hour private lessons courses include one 30-minute private lesson per week. Fee $300. B

1213, 1214, 2213, 2214, 3213, 3214, 4213, 4214 Piano. Two-credit hour private lesson course includes one 1-hour private lesson per week. Reserved for music majors. Fee $450. B

1115, 1116, 2115, 2116, 3115, 3116, 4115, 4116 Guitar. One-credit hour private lessons course includes one 30-minute private lesson per week. Fee $300. B

1215, 1216, 2215, 2216, 3215, 3216, 4215, 4216 Guitar. Two-credit hour private lesson course includes one 1-hour private lesson per week. Reserved for music majors. Fee $450. B

1117, 1118, 2117, 2118, 3117, 3118, 4117, 4118 Strings. One-credit hour private lessons course includes one 30-minute private lesson per week. Fee $300. B

1217, 1218, 2217, 2218, 3217, 3218, 4217, 4218 Strings. Two-credit hour private lesson course includes one 1-hour private lesson per week. Reserved for music majors. Fee $450. B

1119, 1120, 2119, 2120, 3119, 3120, 4119, 4120 Brass. One-credit hour private lessons course includes one 30-minute private lesson per week. Fee $300. B

1219, 1220, 2219, 2220, 3219, 3220, 4219, 4220 Brass. Two-credit hour private lesson course includes one 1-hour private lesson per week. Reserved for music majors. Fee $450. B

1121, 1122, 2121, 2122, 3121, 3122, 4121, 4122 Woodwinds. One-credit hour private lessons course includes one 30-minute private lesson per week. Fee $300. B

1221, 1222, 2221, 2222, 3221, 3222, 4221, 4222 Woodwinds. Two-credit hour private lesson course includes one 1-hour private lesson per week. Reserved for music majors. Fee $450. B

1125, 1126, 2125, 2126, 3125, 3126, 4125, 4126 Percussion. One-credit hour private lessons course includes one 30-minute private lesson per week. Fee $300. B

1225, 1226, 2225, 2226, 3225, 3226, 4225, 4226 Percussion. Two-credit hour private lesson course includes one 1-hour private lesson per week. Reserved for music majors. Fee $450. B

1127, 1128, 2127, 2128, 3127, 3128, 4127, 4128 Harpsichord. One-credit hour private lessons course includes one 30-minute private lesson per week. Fee $300. B

1227, 1228, 2227, 2228, 3227, 3228, 3227, 4228 Harpsichord. Two-credit hour private lesson course includes one 1-hour private lesson per week. Reserved for music majors. Fee $450. B

(NRC) Natural Resources Ecology and Conservation

1300  Introduction to Wildlife Management. Introductory course dealing with factors involved in managing wildlife populations to benefit species and habitat from both an environmental and commercial perspective. F

2300  Environmental Systems. Principles of natural systems; ecosystems structure, function and management. S

2301  Natural Resources and Agriculture. Study of existing and emerging strategies for the compatibility of intensive production agriculture and stewardship of natural resources. Field trips will be required. F

3322  Natural Resources Policy, Regulation, and Compliance. Roles of governmental agencies, private organizations, and the public associated with the creation and implementation of natural resources policies. Major themes include strategies for compliance and conflict resolution. SO

3323  General Ecology. Survey of ecological principles emphasizing the integral relationships of plants and animals. Field trips required. Fee $100.  (2:3) F

3325  Aquatic Ecology and Conservation. Detailed study of the physical, chemical, and biological interactions that occur in aquatic environments. Past, present, and future threats to the natural functioning of aquatic environments is addressed. FO

3333  Geographic Information Systems. Introduction to geographic information systems software and applications. Emphasis placed on applications to natural resources management and conservation.

4200  Senior Seminar. Seminar in natural resources ecology and conservation.

4314  Conservation Biology. Detailed study of the fundamental principles governing biodiversity. Topics include extinction, colonization, genetic diversity, island biogeography, consequences of globalization, and the overall value of biodiversity. Students will explore the application of theory to contemporary practical conservation problems. SE

4330  Natural Resources Internship. Internship in natural resources.

4405  Wildlife and Fisheries Science. Scientific study of the ecology and management of fish and wildlife resources. Designed to provide students significant hands on experience with the techniques of fish and wildlife professionals. Major topics include sampling techniques, species identification, population assessment, data analysis, and interaction with the public. Fee $100.  FE

(NUR) Nursing

3200  Introduction to BSN. Introduction to the concepts of baccalaureate nursing, including the validation process for diploma and associate degree nursing. Students are introduced to resources for degree completion. To be taken in semester of entry. Y

3214  History and Theory of Nursing. Emphasizes the historical development of the discipline of nursing, the integration of nursing theories into practice, and explores other ways of knowing as applied to the understanding of nursing practice. Y

3314  Trends and Issues in Professional Nursing. Explores and relates current trends and issues in nursing to health care in today’s society. Examine changes in health policies and systems.  Y

4303  Complementary Therapies. Introduces complementary therapies with an overview of eastern and western medicine to enhance understanding of benefits of alternative, complementary and holistic approaches to health. B

4305  Community Health II. Application of concepts of prevention and population focused interventions to promote health. Participates in assessment and analysis of determinants of health within a population. Ninety practicum hours. Y

4311  Nursing Research. Explores the research process and its relevance to nursing practice. The primary focus is on the development of the student’s ability to be an effective consumer of research with emphasis on nursing theories and the research process. Y

4314  Leadership and Management I. Explores health care delivery systems and how they function, emphasizing first level leadership and management roles. Examine selected management theories and models and their relationship to nursing management. Y

4316  Leadership and Management II. Application of leadership principles in a variety of health care settings. Collaborating with other health care team members to promote safety and high quality nursing care.  Ninety practicum hours. Y

4318  Professional Role Development. Explores nursing as a profession and the critical issues of professional nursing practice.  The course is designed as the synthesis of prior knowledge toward pursuing practice excellence and to foster lifelong professional growth and development. Y

4320  Comparative Health Systems. Explore health care and health provider roles in other countries through on-location learning. Offers a historical perspective as well as the progression of health care and nursing roles in another country. Y

4399  Evidence Based Practice. Introduction to evidence-based nursing practice. Focus on identification of practice issues; appraisal and integration of current evidence and the evaluation of potential outcomes across all healthcare settings and patient populations. Y

4403  Community Health I. Emphasize the social, spiritual, educational, and cultural factors that impact health care for individuals, families, communities, and populations. Examines roles of nurses in collaboration with other healthcare professionals to provide care within the community.  Y

5101  Advanced Practice Nursing and Forensics: High Risk Populations. Provides the advanced practice nurse with information needed for prevention, assessment, identification, appropriate intervention, and resource referral for patients and families who are at risk for, or currently experiencing, abuse or neglect.

5200  Introduction to Graduate Studies. Provides an orientation and introduction to graduate level study. A focus on electronic database searching and utilization of community-wide library resources, APA style and introduction to writing for publication, accessing and utilizing technology for online courses, and the professional portfolio will be initiated in this course. To be taken the semester of entry to the program. Y

5202  Family Nurse Practitioner Role, Leadership, and Theory. Examines the professional history and evolution of the family nurse practitioner. Discussion of legal parameters that govern advanced practice and the role of the nurse practitioner in providing cost-effective care. The fostering of a leadership role in collaborating with multiple stakeholders to improve health safety, accountability, and quality outcomes is emphasized, as well as, evaluation of nursing theories that are the foundation of the APN role.

5204  Advanced Diagnostics and Procedures. Examine the appropriate use and interpretation of advanced diagnostic tests available to the nurse practitioner in primary care. Various invasive skills common to the primary care setting will be introduced allowing students the ability to develop a basic proficiency. 

5301  Education: Theories in Teaching and Learning. Teaching and learning principles and theories of adult learning and educational processes provide the foundation for this course. Scholarly inquiry into multiple dimensions of the role of professional educator and leader are examined. The management of educational activities, staff development, curriculum planning, design, and evaluation, and the facilitation of learning in a variety of settings are addressed. B

5302  Research and Statistical Methods. Provides practical skills to translate practice problems into researchable questions. Examination of quantitative and qualitative research methods, data collection, selection of measurements, and statistical analyses are considered. Students will develop a research proposal from significances to determination of the research plan. Fee $50. Y

5303  Education and Information Technology Applications. Study of theoretical and practical characteristics of technology integration strategies, including using instructional software, using technology media, and integrating technology into the curriculum or practice environment in the role of nurse educator or leader are explored. Y

5304  Management of Health Care Resources. Economic and resource management, financial planning and budgeting, reimbursement systems in health care, cost containment, spreadsheets and human resource management for the nurse in an advanced role of educator or leader/administrator across health care settings comprise the focus of this course. Y

5305  Nursing Theory. Examines historical and contemporary theoretical bases for advanced nursing practice. Analysis of selected models and theories from nursing and other disciplines are considered in the context of traditional, alternative, and complementary approaches to health promotion, disease prevention, and human responses to illness at the level of individual, family, and community. The concepts of person, health, environment, spirituality, and nursing are explored. B

5306  Global Culture and Health I. Travel to a selected country to experience the spiritual dimension of health care delivery, nursing education, and the role of nurses in a culturally diverse setting. The course offers a transcultural experience outside the U.S. Learning takes place through observation, experience, interaction, and critical thinking via on site visits and by reviewing current nursing and general literature. The course is designed to enhance the development of critical thinking and communication skills at on-site locations. University faculty and resource persons in the selected country will make arrangements for the desired experiences. Ninety practicum hours. Fee varies depending on global experience and costs associated with experience. Check with department prior to enrolling. Y

5307  Applying Best Practices in Community Health Care. Examines applications of research-based practices to policy and nursing care decisions and delivery at the organizational, community, state, and national level. Research applications of solving practical organizational and system problems, quality and outcome indicators, reducing medical errors to produce a safer health care system with a major emphasis on community is the focus of this course. Students will propose a grant or quality improvement plan to improve a practice issue in the workplace. Ninety practicum hours. Y

5308  Global Culture and Health II. Travel to a selected country to experience the spiritual dimension of health care delivery, nursing education, and the role of nurses in a culturally diverse setting. The course offers a transcultural experience outside the U.S. Learning takes place through observation, experience, interaction, and critical thinking via on site visits and by reviewing current nursing and general literature. The course is designed to enhance the development of critical thinking and communication skills at on-site locations. University faculty and resource persons in the selected country will make arrangements for the desired experiences. Ninety practicum hours. Fee varies depending on global experience and costs associated with experience. Check with department prior to enrolling. Y

5309  Leadership and Management. Focuses on the analysis, application, and integration of 21st century leadership and management skills into the behavior of the nurse in the role of educator and leader. Practical organizational and problem-solving skills, resource management and development, collaboration, team building, and effective communication are emphasized. Y

5310  Education/Leadership Practicum. Application of program course work occurs in this capstone course in which students participate in field experience with a preceptor where they practice in the advanced role of nursing educator and leader in a selected field experience. Within the didactic sessions for this course, particular attention is given to the discussion of Best Practices in Education and Leadership. The course culminates in the presentation of the professional portfolio. Ninety practicum hours. Y

5311  Professional Issues: Law and Ethics. Examines the professional, ethical, legal, political, and social dimensions of developing an identity as an advanced practice nurse within the context of nursing practice, institutional, and community environments. Issues of health disparity, cultural diversity, and the health needs of underserved populations are examined. Further areas of consideration will include professional standards and certification, code of ethics, bioethical issues, confidentiality, plagiarism, and liability, regulatory, and collective bargaining considerations. Y

5312  Advanced Physiology/Pathophysiology. Overview of advanced concepts related to normal and abnormal body functioning. The primary focus is on in-depth and current understanding of disease processes across the lifespan integrating risk factors for disease in various populations. 

5313  Pharmacotherapeutics. Focuses on the clinical application of pharmacology needed in the provision of advanced practice nursing. The emphasis is on drugs commonly used in the family practice of ambulatory primary health care setting for the treatment of acute and chronic disease, and on the integration of drug therapy as one component of therapeutic management plans. The application of the principles of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics to clinical use of drugs will be explored, including therapeutic dosage patterns, side effects, drug interactions, contraindications.

5334  Advanced Health Assessment. Includes 90 clinical hours. Provides student with ability to expand their knowledge and skills in performing a comprehensive health assessment of patients across the lifespan. Emphasis placed on utilizing thorough assessment to distinguish normal and abnormal variants in health, guide health promotion activities, and identify the need for patient-specific disease prevention interventions. Fee: $984

5338  Advanced Nursing Care: Pediatric. Focuses on the appropriate diagnosis, management, and prevention of common acute and chronic illnesses specific to the pediatric population. Human growth and development, holistic, and spiritual concepts will be incorporated.

5341  Advanced Nursing Care: Adult/Geriatric. Focuses on the appropriate diagnosis, management, and prevention of common acute and chronic illnesses specific to the adult and geriatric populations. Human growth and development, holistic, and spiritual concepts will be examined.

5344  Advanced Nursing Care: Women/Prenatal Primary Care. Includes 90 clinical hours. Application of advanced health assessment skills, identification of abnormalities in health, interpreting diagnostic findings, improving communication skills, formulating a diagnosis and plan of care, and implementing preventative and health promotion education in a focused practice environment.

5361  Interpersonal and Counseling Skills in Human and Organizational Behavior. Provides an introduction to understanding and developing effective interpersonal communication skills and relationships in the role of educator and leader/administrator. The processes, principles, and techniques associated with counseling the individual and groups, negotiating, grievance, stress management, and group dynamics are explored in this course. Conflict and conflict resolution, interviewing, listening, and group leadership skills are examined. Summer

5640  Clinical Practicum: Primary Care Pediatrics. Includes 270 clinical hours. Application of concepts presented in Advanced Nursing Care with focus on refining health assessment skills, identifying abnormalities in health, interpreting diagnostic findings, improving communication skills, formulating a diagnosis and evidenced-based plan of care, and implementing preventative and health promotion education in culturally diverse populations.

5643  Clinical Practicum: Primary Care Adult/Geriatric. Includes 270 clinical hours. Application of concepts presented in Advanced Nursing Care with focus on refining health assessment skills, identifying abnormalities in health, interpreting diagnostic findings, improving communication skills, formulating a diagnosis and plan of care, and implementing preventative and health promotion education in culturally diverse populations.

6300  Evidence-Based Project. Culmination of program course work occurs in this course in which students participate in a community based field experience reflecting the role of the family nurse practitioner. Pending faculty approval, each student will develop and present an evidence-based project based on the needs of an identified population. This course is the capstone practicum experience for the family nurse practitioner track.

(PFP) Personal Financial Planning

3300  Financial Stewardship. Personal finances from the perspective of becoming a responsible steward. Topics covered will include budgeting, savings, investing, giving, and managing money. PRE: FIN 2301. Fee $100.  

3310  Retirement Planning. Foundational course in retirement planning. PRE: FIN 2301

3320  Insurance Planning, Risk Management, and Employee Benefits. Fundamentals of risk management and insurance, including the nature and treatment of pure loss exposures; legal principles; and property, liability, life and health insurance. PRE: FIN 2301 and FIN 3300

4310  Estate Planning and Taxation. Foundational course in estate planning methodologies and policies related to tax issues. PRE: FIN 2301 and ACC 4305

4320  Securities Analysis and Asset Allocation. Focuses on the theory and practice of asset allocation. Topics covered include setting investment goals, risk tolerance, diversification and risk reduction, basic security valuation and analysis, capital markets, investment alternatives, and fundamentals of portfolio design. PRE: FIN 2301 and FIN 4309

4380  Case Studies in Financial Planning. Integrates the financial planning content areas into the development of comprehensive financial plans. PRE: FIN 2301 and PFP 4320 or concurrent enrollment in PFP 4320

(PHI) Philosophy

2304  Introduction to Philosophy. Introduction to philosophy and a review of the history of Western thought. Course considers the nature of knowledge, truth, worldview, and the use of rhetoric in philosophy. SE

3303  Plato. Introduction to the Republic, the seminal work in the Western tradition, as an introduction to Platonism and to all the familiar themes of Western philosophy, and particularly justice, government, and political philosophy. FE

3304  Augustine and Aquinas. Advanced introduction to the thought and influence of the two major Christian thinkers in medieval Western history. Students will engage Augustine’s Confessions and City of God, and selected portions of Aquinas’ Summa Theological, with a view to the thinkers’ influence on Western philosophy and theology. SE

3305  Ethics. Study of ethical theory from the perspectives of philosophy and Christian theology, with an emphasis on application to contemporary issues in medicine, business, politics, and society. B

3310  Aristotle’s Ethics. Introduction to the classic work in Western ethics, including understanding Aristotle’s originary concern with phenomena and terms, like ethics–we now, following him, take for granted, virtue, character, morals, the good, and the truly or fully human life, with emphasis on development of our own character, excellence, and happiness. FO

4306  Philosophy of Religion. Study of religious knowledge and experience, faith and reason, the concept and arguments for God, and the problem of evil. FE

6312  Studies in Philosophy. Examination of key philosophies and philosophers with an emphasis on the Classical Western Philosophic tradition.

(PHY) Physics

1103  General Physics I Lab. Experiments in mechanics and wave motion to accompany PHY 1303. F

1104  General Physics II Lab. Electricity and optics. S

2101  Engineering Physics I Lab. Mechanics, wave motion. F

2102  Engineering Physics II Lab. Optics, electricity, and magnetism. S

1303  General Physics I. Non-calculus introduction for science majors other than those in physics, chemistry, or engineering. Covers mechanics and wave motion. F

1304  General Physics II. Primarily electricity, magnetism, and optics. S

2301  Engineering Physics I. Calculus-based course for students in physics, chemistry, engineering, and mathematics. Includes mechanics, thermodynamics, and wave motion. F

2302  Engineering Physics II. Optics, electricity, magnetism, and some nuclear physics. S

(PSY) Psychology

1300  General Psychology. Introductory course concerning the major theories and recent research in the broad field of psychology. B

2310  Lifespan Human Development. Physical and psychological development of the individual from infancy through adulthood. B

2340  Psychology of Diversity. Survey of the nature and characteristics of diverse populations from a historical perspective and current perspective. In addition, insight and understanding of social relationships in a culturally diverse society are examined. B

3300  Child and Adolescent Development. Study of physical, intellectual, social, and psychological development from birth through adolescence. Does not count toward the major. B

3302  Counseling Theories and Techniques. Study of the major models and theories of psychotherapy. Special attention will be given to developing basic therapeutic skills associated with these theories. PRE: PSY 1300. S

3303  Abnormal Psychology. Study of the etiology and the nature of individual abnormalities. Some attention is given to the measurement and therapy of various abnormalities. B

3304  Adolescent Psychology. Application of developmental theory and cultural contexts to the understanding of persons in transition to adulthood. Does not count toward the major. S

3310  Psychological Statistics. Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics from the T test to Chi square. Includes introduction to analysis of variance, multiple regression, and non-parametric techniques. Fee $50. B

3311  Introduction to Counseling Professions. Introduction to the practices of psychologists, professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists. In addition to training in basic helping and interviewing skills, this course will survey career opportunities, ethical issues, and professional issues associated with the various helping professions. F

3315  Ethics in the Helping Professions. Focuses on the professional practices and ethics in the helping profession as well as the legal aspects of providing professional services in helping professions. Students learn to manage themselves and their professional practice to be both legal and ethical. F

3320  Social Research Methods. Introduction to the major steps of scientific inquiry into social relations. Emphasis will be placed on survey design and analysis. PRE: PSY 1300 or SWK 2300. S

3322  Gender and Sexuality. Human gender and sexuality from a life cycle perspective, with an emphasis on developmental, familial, and societal factors that influence gender and sexuality. S

3324  Marital and Family Therapy. Introduction to the major models of marriage and family relations, dysfunctions and techniques of intervention. S

3326  Crisis Intervention. Study of crisis situations in multiple settings with emphasis on appropriate behaviors and responses to crisis. Applied therapeutic counseling in general and crisis intervention specifically are presented, along with strategies to alleviate crisis and deal with crisis aftermath. S

3327  Physiological Psychology. Introduction to the nervous system, brain and behavior, neuroanatomy, genetics, neurological basis of learning, cognition, sensation, memory, motivation, and abnormal behavior.

3350  Psychology of Aging. Theory and research on aging, covering demographic, sociocultural, economic, individual, and social factors. S

3381  Social Psychology. Study of the impact of society and the individual’s effect on significant and social institutions. F

4302  Theories of Personality. Introduction to the theories and methods of the study of personality, with emphasis upon the dynamics of personality development. PRE: PSY 1300 or consent of professor. B

4304  Psychological Testing. Provides means of securing, recording, and using test data concerning individuals and groups. Emphasis is given to practical experience in using tests, inventories, and other devices for psychological measurement. PRE: PSY 1300. S

4305  Experimental Psychology. Survey of experimental methods employed in the study of human behavior. Special attention is given to the sensory systems, perception, and learning. Required laboratory is graded with the course. F

4307  Learning, Cognition and Emotion. Study of the principles of learning, cognition and emotion, and their applications to the understanding of human development and personality. PRE: PSY 1300. F

4321  Forensic Psychology. Study of the intersection of crime, law, and psychology. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how abnormal behavior is treated in the judicial system, as well as civil commitment and criminal competencies. F

4322  Drugs, Alcohol, and Behavior. Survey of psychological factors involved in drug use and an introduction to chemotherapy used in treatment of mental illness. S

4390  Practicum. Participation in a departmentally approved structured and supervised setting to give an introductory experience to the field of psychology. Each student participating in a field experience MUST purchase professional liability insurance through the university. Students who are not psychology majors may take the course with departmental approval. Course may be repeated for credit with departmental approval. Students in this course will be encouraged to become members in a professional behavioral science organization such as ACA, NCFR, APA, or AACA. Fee $300.  B

(REA) Reading

2210  Critical Reading. Improvement of critical reading skills, including reading comprehension, vocabulary development, and reading rate.

3330  Literacy and the Young Child. Developmentally appropriate techniques and materials designed to assist young children in pre-reading and the transition to beginning reading. Includes field experience. B

3340  The Reading Writing Connection. Theories and strategies for developing communication skills and reasoning abilities. Emphasis will be on the integration and application of listening, speaking, writing, and thinking skills throughout the curriculum. Students will spend a minimum of 12 clock-hours observing and teaching in an elementary/middle school setting. B

4350  Practical Applications to Reading. Organization and use of content, learning experiences, and resources for teaching reading in the elementary school. B

4360  Reading Across the Curriculum/Practicum. Theories and strategies for teaching and integrating reading strategies throughout the elementary/middle school curriculum. Emphasis will be placed on developing and delivering a one-week content area unit. Students will spend a minimum of 10 clock hours in their assigned classroom before beginning the unit. B

(REL) Religion and Theology

3301  World Religions. Study of the history, literature, and practices of the living major world religions. F

3311  Topics in Theology. Examine theological thinking, types of theology, and important theological issues. F

3312  Syro-Palestinian Archeology. Dynamics of the interplay of history, religion, and culture through the philosophy and science of Near Eastern archaeology. Students encounter concepts of worldview, morality, religion, and culture. D

3368  Intermediate Studies in Religion/Theology. Supervised intermediate research and writing in a specific religion or theology area. Specific semester topics will appear on the transcript. PRE: permission of instructor. D

6301  World Religions. Study of the major world religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Islam, and Christianity), using historical, sociological, phenomenological, and comparative theological methodologies. While all religions are studies, specific emphases may be given to certain regions, religious subsets, themes, and/or teachings.

6312  Studies in Theology. Analysis of specific theological trends and current religious thought.

6333  Ethics. Study of ethical decision making with an emphasis on the historical development of ethical and Christian thought.

6334  Christian History and Theology I. Study of major events, people, and historical and theological developments in Christian history ranging from the emergence of the Christian church reflected in the New Testament to the late Medieval period.

6335  Christian History and Theology II. Study of major events, people, and historical and theological developments in Christian history ranging from the 16th century period of Reformations to the contemporary setting.

(SOC) Sociology

1300  General Sociology. General introduction to sociology, including the relationships of the individual to the society and culture of which the person is a part. B

3301  Criminology. Overview of the major criminological perspectives and an examination of the social, political, and intellectual milieu within which each developed. The course focuses on the multi-disciplinary nature of criminological thought. F

3302  Juvenile Delinquency. Adjustment of youths as they take on the roles and statuses culturally defined for their age group; emphasis on causation, treatment, and prevention of juvenile delinquency; sociological principles for working with youth. Delinquency is reviewed as a form of deviant behavior. S

3322  Social Deviance. Psychological and sociological aspects of socially deviant behavior; theoretical overviews and implications for social control and social policy. S

3323  Family Violence. Theoretical issues, both past and present, regarding family violence in order to provide the student with an understanding of the salient issues. In addition, attention will be given to the impact family violence has on the victim and society, legal aspects of family violence, key factors associated with recognition of family violence, and pertinent research focusing on the subject. F

(SWK) Social Work

2300  Introduction to Social Work. Introduction to social work, including a definition of the term itself, a look at the history of social welfare, and a review of the knowledge, values, and skills required of the social work professional. A description of various social work services is provided by speakers from several agencies in the community. B

2320  Social Justice. Analysis of social injustices in contemporary society and an examination of possible policy changes to alleviate the injustices. Designed for both social work and other majors. B

2340  Diversity. Overview of diverse populations. Insight and understanding of social relationships in a culturally diverse society are examined. Cultural competency in social work is emphasized. B

3301  Generalist Practice with Individuals and Families. Study of the values, skills, knowledge, and ethics needed for generalist social work practice with individuals and families. F

3302  Generalist Practice with Communities and Organizations. Study of the skills, knowledge, and ethics needed for generalist social work practice with organizations, communities, and society. S

3303  Generalist Practice with Groups. Study of the skills, knowledge, and ethics needed for generalist social work practice with small groups. F

3304  Social Welfare Policy. Foundation for ethical decision making in social work practice. Theoretical perspectives and models on ethical decision-making, professional ethics, ethical dilemmas, and values are explored. Expectations for professional behavior in the field of social are emphasized. S

3306  Social Work Ethics and Professional Behavior. Examination of the social systems approach to understanding human behavior within families, groups, organizations, and communities. Particular focus will be on the relationship among biological, social, psychological, and cultural systems as they affect and are affected by human behavior. S

3310  Statistics. Introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics from the T test to Chi square. Also includes introduction to analysis of variance, multiple regression, and non-parametric techniques. Fee $50. B

3311  Human Behavior in the Social Environment. Examination of life cycle from birth to death. Focuses on the biological, psychological, sociological, and theoretical perspectives of the lifespan. Attention given to individuals, groups, organizations, and communities. Includes emphasis on diversity, culture, systems, ecological theory, strengths perspective, and empowerment. F

3313  Gerontology. Examines older persons and their social service needs. Special attention given to social work practice with elderly and their social service, family and community needs.

3314  Family and Community Violence. Examines community, school, family, and workplace violence, including identification, classification, prevention, and case management. Encompasses the enormity of violence through a comprehensive, biophysical perspective.

3315  Social Work in Criminal Justice Settings. Provides an overview of the criminal justice system and forensic social work. Explores broader perspectives that have guided and shaped policy in criminal justice, historical trends in criminal justice, and current issues being dealt with at all levels of the criminal justice system. Addresses effective social work practice with juveniles and adults in the community and institutional settings. Emphasis placed on the role of the social work practitioner in the supervision, treatment, and rehabilitation of the population they serve.

3316  International Social Work. Study of international social work profession and global social issues.

3320  Social Research Methods. Introduction to the major steps of scientific inquiry into social realities. Emphasis will be placed on survey design and analysis as well as evaluating one’s own practice. S

3330  Maladaptive Functioning. Study of the etiology and the nature of mental health disorders. Special attention is given to generalist social work processes in relation to social functioning.

4610  Field I. Field work in an agency under supervision for 200 clock hours. Focus is on integration of knowledge with actual social work experience. PRE: 2.5 GPA in SWK 3301, 3302, 3303.

4620  Field II. Field work in an agency under supervision for 200 clock hours. Focus is on integration of knowledge and actual social work experience. PRE: 2.5 GPA in SWK 3301, 3302, 3303, completion of or concurrent enrollment in SWK 4610.

(THA) Theatre Arts

1161  Theatre Activities I: Scenery and Properties. Extensive participation in theatre activities in construction of scenery and of properties. F

1162  Theatre Activities II: Lighting and Sound. Extensive participation in theatre activities in setting and running lighting and sound cues for a production S

1361  Introduction to Acting. Study of basic theories and techniques of the art of acting, with emphasis on character analysis and improvisation. F

2161  Stage Makeup. Learning to design and apply makeup for a theatrical production. F

2302  Principles of Acting. Study and application of the theories and techniques of the art of acting. PRE: THA 1361. S

3301  Principles of Theatrical Scenery. Study of technical problems of play production: design, construction, and painting of scenery and properties and special effects. FO

3304  Principles of Theatrical Lighting. Study of the theory and practice of theatrical stage lighting: elementary electricity, lighting control and instruments, and lighting design. SE

3305  Principles of Theatrical Costumes. Study and application of the theories and techniques of theatrical costuming: survey of historical dress, design for the stage, and construction of theatrical clothing. FE

4301  Stage Directing Methods. Study and practice of fundamental principles and techniques of directing, including student direction of representative plays. PRE: Junior standing, THA 2302, 3301, 3304 and 3305. FE

4304  History of Theatre I. Survey of the history of theatre–the origins of theatre to 1800. SO

4305  History of Theatre II. Survey of the history of theatre, 1800 to the present–Contemporary Theatre. SE

4324  Studies in Shakespeare. Analysis of the development of Shakespeare’s art and thought as viewed through his better known plays. SO

4326  Literature and the Film. Review of film theory, film history, and the development of film making, with an emphasis on criticism of filmed adaptations of significant works of literature. S

4365  Creative Dramatics. Studies in the principles and methods of using creative dramatics teaching elementary school subjects. F

4368  Play Direction. Study and practice of basic principles and techniques that deal with choosing, casting, and staging a play. PRE: Junior standing and consent of the instructor. SO

(UGR) Undergraduate Research

2188, 3188, 4188, 2288, 3288, 4288, 2388, 3388, 4388, 2488, 3488, 4488, 2688, 3688, 4688 Undergraduate Research. Undergraduate research supervised by academic department. Undergraduate research for credit must not be directly associated with other course requirements. Undergraduate research may, at the discretion of the academic chair, be added to the degree plan increasing the total hours required to complete the degree. A maximum of 6 undergraduate research credit hours may be earned. PRE: approval of academic chair.

(UNI) University Studies

1170  University Seminar. Introduction to an academic field. Provide assistance in transition into a major program. Fee $80. B

2000  University Skills. Measures college-level core competencies necessary for success in upper level course work. PRE: Completion of general core. B

(WSH) Washington Internship

4660, 4960 Washington Internship. Internship in Washington, D.C. Significant fee applies, some of which may be offset by funded scholarship. PRE: Permission of Washington Program Director.

(YFM) Youth and Family Ministry

2311  Foundations of Youth and Family Ministry. Introduces students to the world of youth and family ministry and contemporary influences on, and ways to approach, ever-changing youth culture. F

2324  Strategic Issues of Youth and Family Ministry. Explores the pragmatic side of youth and family ministry by considering strategic issues like programming, event planning, youth culture, personal ministry, and other issues necessary for developing effective ministers to youth and their families. S

2326  Children’s Ministry. Explores pragmatic side of ministry to children and their families by considering strategic issues of program management, faith development in children, ministry to self, and other issues leading to the development of effective ministers to children and their families. S

3301  Adolescents and Systems. Study of ministry models based on systems theory with direct application to youth and family ministry. Emphasizes staff relationships, parenting, and counseling implications. F

3302  Family Ministry. Study of models for ministry to families in churches, with an emphasis on a systems approach to family ministry. Life cycle issues, church programming for families, and preventative planning will be studied. Cross listed as MIN 3302. F

4090  Practicum. Supervised internship in student area of ministry, culminating in a final, written report. Recommended for summer completion with fall enrollment. F

4311  Studies in Youth and Family Ministry. Essential classic and contemporary readings and activities in the field. D

4322  Advanced Youth and Family Ministry. Academic culmination of the YFM specialization. Students will develop an integrative and implementable model of youth ministry in the context of family programming. S

Last Updated: Sep 10, 2014