Organizational Communication

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Organizational Communication

What is Organizational Communication?

We study the communication processes and skills that every leader needs to create great organizations. Regardless if you work in a multi-national corporation, a non-profit organization, or a small family business, organizing people to effectively live and work together depends upon strategic communication.

What will I learn?

Students acquire skills for assessing communication problems, designing communication systems, and improving communication quality. Courses cover a variety of communication-based competencies, such as:

  • Team building
  • Communication Networks
  • Communicating in new technologies
  • Conflict resolution 
  • Training and development skills
  • Intercultural and multi-national communication
  • Leadership
  • Rhetorical analysis
  • Principles of public address, persuasion, and influence

What do Employers say about organizational communication?

Dan Sanders-CEO of United Supermarkets and an LCU alum writes in his book the importance of relationships in ORG COM--

"The success of team members rests on our willingness to take the time to forge relationships by first exhibiting servanthood - a genuine desire to help others make the most of their potential."

Kerry Miller-an LCU Alum and Director of Worldwide Internal Communications, Texas Instruments (ret.) explains the importance of ORG COM--

"The deeper you dig into the business world, the more you realize almost every single challenge or opportunity involves communication as a critical dynamic. In many cases, it's actually the difference between failure and success."

"Every business leader I worked with -- at least the successful ones -- considered communication a core competency for themselves and their staff members. It wasn't a nice-to-have quality, it was a have-to-have."

"What I saw in the business world was that if you can't get people to see your point, you don't get to lead. Knowing how to write, speak and present was considered a prerequisite. Those who did it really well were usually the ones you ended up working for."

Last Updated: Sep 03, 2013