Flu Information

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Preparing for the Flu

The Medical Clinic at LCU is working to help prevent and minimize the spread of the flu on campus. Hand sanitizers have been placed in high-traffic areas around campus, helpful tips are posted around campus, and the Medical Clinic staff is working closely with the Residence Life department to prepare and respond to the flu. LCU plans to follow guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control in handling any type of the flu.

Action Steps for Students, Faculty and Staff to Prevent the Spread of Flu

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends 4 main ways to avoid the flu:

  1. Practice good hand hygiene by washing your hands often with soap and water, especially after coughing or sneezing. Alcohol-based hand cleaners also are effective. 
  2. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. If you don't have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your sleeve or shoulder, not into your hands. 
  3. If you are sick, stay home or at your place of residence for at least 24 hours after you no longer have a fever (100 degrees Fahrenheit or 38 degrees Celsius) or signs of a fever (have chills, feel very warm, have a flushed appearance, or are sweating). This should be determined before the use of fever-reducing medications (any medicine that contains ibuprofen or acetaminophen). Staying away from others while sick can prevent others from getting sick too. Ask a roommate, friend or family member to check up on you and to bring you food and supplies if needed. 

    It is your responsibility to notify the appropriate person if you experience these symptoms. If you are a student (even if you live off campus), please contact the Residence Life staff. 
  4. Talk to your health care provider to find out if you should be vaccinated for seasonal flu.
    1. Information about seasonal flu vaccine can be found at: www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/keyfacts.htm.

Regular Flu Shots

Regular Flu Shots

  • Available soon to students and employees
  • $15.00 each 
  • Contains only inactive (dead) virus 
  • Thimersol free, mercury free and latex free 
  • Persons with asthma, diabetes, heart disease and other chronic or long-term medical conditions are at high risk of flu complications and should be vaccinated to prevent those complications.

Medical Clinic Mailing Address:
5601 19th St.
Lubbock, Texas 79407

Phone: 806.720.7482

Fax: 806.720.7483

Seasonal Flu and 2009 H1N1 FAQ

Q. What steps can students, faculty and staff take to stay healthy and keep from spreading the flu?

  • Practice good hand hygiene. Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after coughing or sneezing. Alcohol-based hand cleaners also are effective. 
  • Practice respiratory etiquette. The main way flu spreads is from person to person in droplets produced by coughs and sneezes, so it's important to cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. If you don't have a tissue, you should cough or sneeze into your sleeve or shoulder, not your hands. 
  • Stay home if you are sick. Stay home or in your place of residence for at least 24 hours after you no longer have a fever. 
  • Talk to your health care providers about whether you should be vaccinated. Students, faculty and staff who want protection from the seasonal flu can receive the vaccination by contacting the LCU Medical Clinic. Students, faculty and staff who are at higher risk for flu complications from 2009 H1N1 flu should consider getting the vaccine when it becomes available in the fall. People at higher risk for complications include pregnant women and people with chronic medical conditions (such as asthma, heart disease or diabetes). For more information about priority groups for vaccination, visit www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/vaccination/acip.htm.

Students, faculty and staff should take personal responsibility to help slow the spread of the flu virus. By practicing these steps, you can avoid the flu and help protect others from getting it. 

Q. Who should receive a flu vaccination?

Everyone is encouraged to receive the seasonal flu vaccine, which is currently available at the LCU Medical Clinic. Children 6 months through 18 years of age, people of any age with chronic medical conditions (such as asthma, heart disease or diabetes), and everyone age 50 and older should be vaccinated against seasonal flu as early as possible.

The 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine should be available in the fall. We recommend those at higher risk for complications get the 2009 H1N1 flu vaccine when it first becomes available. 

Q. Will LCU provide vaccinations for seasonal and 2009 H1N1 flu?

The seasonal flu vaccination is currently available through the LCU Medical Clinic. The LCU Medical Clinic is working with local public health partners to have on-site vaccination clinics for the 2009 H1N1 flu when it becomes available in the fall. Check this page regularly for updates on vaccine availability dates and clinic hours. Information about 2009 H1N1 flu vaccination can be found at: www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/vaccination. Information about seasonal flu vaccine can be found at www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/keyfacts.htm

Q. What are the symptoms of seasonal flu and the 2009 H1N1 flu? 

Symptoms of flu include fever or chills and cough or sore throat. In addition, symptoms can include runny nose, body aches, headache, tiredness, diarrhea or vomiting. 

Q. How do I know if someone has seasonal flu or the 2009 H1N1 flu? 

It will be very difficult to tell if someone who is sick has 2009 H1N1 flu rather than the seasonal flu. The treatments for the 2009 H1N1 flu and seasonal flu will be the same even after the 2009 H1N1 vaccine becomes available this fall. We will notify students as soon as we confirm the date of arrival for the vaccine. At this time, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention does not recommend testing to determine if flu cases are the 2009 H1N1 flu or the regular seasonal flu because the vaccine is not available and the treatment is the same. Therefore, we are taking steps to prevent the spread of any kind of flu on campus. We are working closely with the local health department to monitor flu conditions and make decisions about the best steps to take concerning our institution. 

Q. What steps will LCU take to keep sick students, faculty and staff from spreading flu?

LCU is following recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control during current flu conditions. We are:

  • Providing hand sanitizers and hand-washing supplies in locations throughout campus. 
  • Posting signage throughout campus with preventative tips and instructions about handling flu-like symptoms. 
  • Using face masks and separating healthy and sick patients in the LCU Medical Clinic. 
  • Encouraging sick students, faculty and staff to stay home and away from other people until at least 24 hours after they no longer have a fever (100 degrees Fahrenheit or 38 degrees Celsius) or signs of a fever (have chills, feel very warm, have flushed appearance or are sweating). This should be determined before the use of fever-reducing medications (any medicine that contains ibuprofen or acetaminophen). 
  • Asking sick students with private rooms to remain in their own rooms and receive care and meals from one person, if possible. 
  • Communicating and instructing students to promptly seek medical attention if they have a medical condition that places them at higher risk of flu-related complications, are concerned about their illness, or develop severe symptoms. 
  • Updating our website regularly with current flu information.
Last Updated: May 29, 2013